Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Researchers pinpoint upper safe limit of vitamin D blood levels, study suggests

Date:
April 30, 2013
Source:
The Endocrine Society
Summary:
Researchers claim to have calculated, for the first time, the upper safe limit of vitamin D levels, above which the associated risk for cardiovascular events or death raises significantly, according to a recent study.

Researchers claim to have calculated for the first time, the upper safe limit of vitamin D levels, above which the associated risk for cardiovascular events or death raises significantly, according to a recent study accepted for publication in The Endocrine Society's Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism (JCEM).

There is increasing evidence that vitamin D plays a pivotal role in human physiology. Vitamin D deficiency has been linked to cardiovascular events and mortality, but previous studies have found supplementation fails to decrease mortality or cardiovascular events, while other studies found only minor positive effects.

"The unpredictable results from previous studies may be due to the misconception that 'the higher the better,'" said Yosef Dror, PhD, of Hebrew University in Rehovot, Israel, and lead author of the study. "Although our study did not directly test the impact of vitamin D supplementation, we believe our results suggest it may be possible that only moderate supplementation within a narrow range of serum calcidiol (the main vitamin D fraction in the blood) will be associated with the most positive results."

Researchers conducted a study of 422,000 people aged 45 years or older, who underwent vitamin D blood assays. They found for the first time that the safe range of vitamin D levels with respect to coronary morbidity lies between 20 to 36 ng/mL. Vitamin D levels below and above this range adjusted rates of increased mortality and morbidity significantly.

More than 60 percent of the tested population had insufficient blood levels of vitamin D. Half of these subjects had severely low vitamin D levels which was associated with a 1.5 times increased risk of acute coronary morbidity or mortality. Three percent of those tested had elevated vitamin D levels above 36 ng/mL, which was associated with a 1.13 times elevated risk of coronary morbidity or death.

"Supplementing the entire population may jeopardize those found within the upper-normal range, shifting them to levels that are beyond the range associated with the lowest morbidity rates," said Dror. "Although we could not assess the impact of Vitamin D supplementation, our results may suggest that such supplementation to increase vitamin D blood levels, with strict monitoring to avoid overload, may have a significant influence on public health. This hypothesis still needs to be assessed in intervention trials"

Other researchers working on the study include: Shmuel Meir Giveon of Tel-Aviv University in Israel; and Moshe Hoshen, Ilan Feldhamer, Ran Balicer and Becca Feldman of the Clalit Research Institute, Clalit Health Services in Israel.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by The Endocrine Society. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Y. Dror, S. Giveon, M. Hoshen, I. Feldhamer, R. Balicer, B. Feldman. Vitamin D Levels for Preventing Acute Coronary Syndrome and Mortality: Evidence of a Non-Linear Association. Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism, 2013; DOI: 10.1210/jc.2013-1185

Cite This Page:

The Endocrine Society. "Researchers pinpoint upper safe limit of vitamin D blood levels, study suggests." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 30 April 2013. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/04/130430131623.htm>.
The Endocrine Society. (2013, April 30). Researchers pinpoint upper safe limit of vitamin D blood levels, study suggests. ScienceDaily. Retrieved October 1, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/04/130430131623.htm
The Endocrine Society. "Researchers pinpoint upper safe limit of vitamin D blood levels, study suggests." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/04/130430131623.htm (accessed October 1, 2014).

Share This



More Health & Medicine News

Wednesday, October 1, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Ebola Cases Keep Coming for Monrovia's Island Hospital

Ebola Cases Keep Coming for Monrovia's Island Hospital

AFP (Oct. 1, 2014) A look inside Monrovia's Island Hospital, a key treatment centre in the fight against Ebola in Liberia's capital city. Duration: 00:34 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Ebola Puts Stress on Liberian Health Workers

Ebola Puts Stress on Liberian Health Workers

AP (Oct. 1, 2014) The Ebola outbreak is putting stress on first responders in Liberia. Ambulance drivers say they are struggling with chronic shortages of safety equipment and patients who don't want to go to the hospital. (Oct. 1) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Doctors Reassure Public Ebola Patient Won't Cause Outbreak

Doctors Reassure Public Ebola Patient Won't Cause Outbreak

Newsy (Sep. 30, 2014) After the announcement that the first U.S. patient had been diagnosed with Ebola, doctors were quick to say a U.S. outbreak is highly unlikely. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
TX Hospital Confirms Patient Admitted With Ebola

TX Hospital Confirms Patient Admitted With Ebola

AP (Sep. 30, 2014) Medical officials from Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital confirm they are treating a patient with the Ebola virus, the first case found in the US. (Sept. 30 Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins