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Difference in arterial health seen in highly active college-age people compared to inactive peers

Date:
May 31, 2013
Source:
Indiana University
Summary:
Researchers found that people in their 20s already began to demonstrate arterial stiffening -- when arteries become less compliant as blood pumps through the body -- but their highly active peers did not. A reduction in compliance of the body's arteries is considered a risk factor, predictive of future cardiovascular disease, such as high blood pressure and stroke. This new study is the first to examine arterial stiffening in a young, healthy population.

Indiana University researchers found that people in their 20s already began to demonstrate arterial stiffening -- when arteries become less compliant as blood pumps through the body -- but their highly active peers did not.

The researchers made a similar discovery with middle-age men and women, finding that highly active study participants did not show the arterial stiffening that typically comes with aging, regardless of their gender or age. A reduction in compliance of the body's arteries is considered a risk factor, predictive of future cardiovascular disease, such as high blood pressure and stroke. This new study is the first to examine arterial stiffening in a young, healthy population.

"It was surprising," said Joel Stager, professor in the Department of Kinesiology in the IU School of Public Health-Bloomington. "The college-age group, which reflected the general population, already showed a difference in the health of their small arteries. Compliance of the small arteries, in particular, is seen as an effective predictor of future cardiovascular disease."

The researchers looked at compliance of large and small arteries. For the middle-aged study participants, typical stiffening was seen in both types of arteries for those who were inactive and moderately active, but not for the highly active. In the younger groups, the stiffening was seen only in the smaller arteries for the less active group.

"This indicates that the effect of exercise reported for aging populations seems to exist in young populations as well," the researchers wrote in their report. "That small artery compliance is low in the less active young population should be of general concern, as low small arterial compliance is recognized as an index of cardiovascular risk."

Findings from "Arterial Compliance in a Young Population" were discussed during a poster presentation at the annual meeting of the American College of Sports Medicine in Indianapolis on May 28 to June 1. Co-authors are Christopher Mattson, Maleah Holland and Eric Ress, researchers at the IU School of Public Health-Bloomington. Findings from "Small and Large Arterial Stiffness and Aging in Highly Active People" also were discussed during a poster presentation on Wednesday. Co-author is Holland.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Indiana University. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Indiana University. "Difference in arterial health seen in highly active college-age people compared to inactive peers." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 31 May 2013. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/05/130531132740.htm>.
Indiana University. (2013, May 31). Difference in arterial health seen in highly active college-age people compared to inactive peers. ScienceDaily. Retrieved August 30, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/05/130531132740.htm
Indiana University. "Difference in arterial health seen in highly active college-age people compared to inactive peers." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/05/130531132740.htm (accessed August 30, 2014).

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