Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

How to boost Hispanics' participation in clinical trials? Relate to them, study shows

Date:
June 27, 2013
Source:
H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center & Research Institute
Summary:
Hispanic cancer patients rarely participate in clinical trials, but researchers want to tailor a Spanish DVD to help change this. To create a relevant educational tool, researchers investigated why awareness of and participation in trials are so low in this population.

Hispanic cancer patients rarely participate in clinical trials, but researchers want to tailor a Spanish DVD to help change this. To create a relevant educational tool, Moffitt Cancer Center researchers investigated why awareness of and participation in trials are so low in this population.

Using focus groups with 36 Spanish-speaking cancer survivors from Tampa and Puerto Rico, researchers found that a language barrier, as well as a cultural idea that only doctors, not patients, guide treatment decisions, may help account for low participation rates.

Looking for ways to improve knowledge and participation for Hispanic patients, the researchers used feedback from the focus groups to help develop a Spanish booklet and video to educate and empower patients to participate in treatment decisions.

The study was published online in May by the Journal of Health Communication: International Perspectives.

The 45.5 million Hispanics living in the United States are the nation's fastest growing ethnic group, and there is a need to develop health care educational materials that target their language and culture. These educational materials should not be merely translated from English, the researchers said, but should be adapted to meet the group's informational needs in a culturally appropriate way.

"We found that Hispanic patients who prefer information in Spanish had different informational needs and concerns than non-Hispanic patients," said study lead author Gwendolyn P. Quinn, Ph.D., scientific director of the Survey Methods Core Facility and member of the Health Outcomes and Behavior Program at Moffitt. "Keeping that in mind, we developed educational materials using a social marketing approach, which targets a specific audience instead of creating a generic product for everyone. This approach increases the chances a patient may relate to the material, making their behavior change more likely."

The social marketing intervention in this study was aimed at increasing clinical trial participation by Hispanic patients. However, the researchers found several examples of culturally based ideas that may have kept patients from enrolling in a clinical trial. For example, there was confusion among Hispanic patients over why a doctor would ask them to make a treatment decision, such as participating in a clinical trial. The prevailing cultural idea, they found, was that Hispanic patients had a core belief that the doctor will tell them what to do. Also in Hispanic culture, the patient relies on his or her family to help make health care decisions.

Their research shows a need to present culturally tailored information for specific audiences. The researchers are using the Spanish video and booklet in a randomized clinical trial to evaluate the effectiveness in improving the clinical trials perceptions of Spanish-speaking cancer patients.

"We feel the educational materials we developed will empower Hispanic patients by improving their capacity to make health care decisions, such as enrolling in a clinical trial," explained Quinn. "They may say no, but they will be prepared with knowledge about the purpose of clinical trials and will not be making an uninformed decision."


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center & Research Institute. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Gwendolyn P. Quinn, Jessica McIntyre, Luis E. Gonzalez, Teresita Muñoz Antonia, Prado Antolino, Kristen J. Wells. Improving Awareness of Cancer Clinical Trials Among Hispanic Patients and Families: Audience Segmentation Decisions for a Media Intervention. Journal of Health Communication, 2013; DOI: 10.1080/10810730.2013.768723

Cite This Page:

H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center & Research Institute. "How to boost Hispanics' participation in clinical trials? Relate to them, study shows." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 27 June 2013. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/06/130627102619.htm>.
H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center & Research Institute. (2013, June 27). How to boost Hispanics' participation in clinical trials? Relate to them, study shows. ScienceDaily. Retrieved April 17, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/06/130627102619.htm
H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center & Research Institute. "How to boost Hispanics' participation in clinical trials? Relate to them, study shows." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/06/130627102619.htm (accessed April 17, 2014).

Share This



More Health & Medicine News

Thursday, April 17, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Could Even Casual Marijuana Use Alter Your Brain?

Could Even Casual Marijuana Use Alter Your Brain?

Newsy (Apr. 16, 2014) — A new study conducted by researchers at Northwestern and Harvard suggests even casual marijuana use can alter your brain. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Thousands Of Vials Of SARS Virus Go Missing

Thousands Of Vials Of SARS Virus Go Missing

Newsy (Apr. 16, 2014) — A research institute in Paris somehow misplaced more than 2,000 vials of the deadly SARS virus. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Formerly Conjoined Twins Released From Dallas Hospital

Formerly Conjoined Twins Released From Dallas Hospital

Newsy (Apr. 16, 2014) — Conjoined twins Emmett and Owen Ezell were separated by doctors in August. Now, nearly nine months later, they're being released from the hospital. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Ebola Outbreak Now Linked To 121 Deaths

Ebola Outbreak Now Linked To 121 Deaths

Newsy (Apr. 15, 2014) — The ebola virus outbreak in West Africa is now linked to 121 deaths. Health officials fear the virus will continue to spread in urban areas. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
 
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:  

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:  

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile iPhone Android Web
Follow Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins