Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Scientists discover new mechanism regulating the immune response

Date:
June 28, 2013
Source:
Suomen Akatemia (Academy of Finland)
Summary:
Scientists in Finland have discovered a new mechanism regulating the immune response that can leave a person susceptible to autoimmune diseases.

Scientists at an Academy of Finland Centre of Excellence have discovered a new mechanism regulating the immune response that can leave a person susceptible to autoimmune diseases.

A fresh study by Turku Centre for Biotechnology and Aalto University in Finland is the first to report a new mechanism that regulates specification of lymphocytes, the white blood cells pivotal to immune response. By combining state-of-the art techniques, next-generation deep sequencing and computational data mining, the researchers discovered new epigenetic factors regulating lymphocyte function.

Regulatory regions of the genes studied displayed variations (single nucleotide polymorphisms or SNPs) that have been associated with predisposition to autoimmune diseases such as type1 diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis and inflammatory bowel disease. These discoveries provide new insight into and basis for the study of emergent mechanisms of immune-mediated diseases.

Immune-mediated diseases such as type 1 diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis, asthma and allergies result from abnormal immune response. T lymphocytes that orchestrate the immune response can differentiate into functionally distinct lineages to combat infection and disease. The correct response to cytokines and a controlled balance of T lymphocyte populations are critical for the immune system and for the avoidance of autoimmune disorders.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Suomen Akatemia (Academy of Finland). Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. R. David Hawkins, Antti Larjo, Subhash K. Tripathi, Ulrich Wagner, Ying Luu, Tapio Lönnberg, Sunil K. Raghav, Leonard K. Lee, Riikka Lund, Bing Ren, Harri Lähdesmäki, Riitta Lahesmaa. Global Chromatin State Analysis Reveals Lineage-Specific Enhancers during the Initiation of Human T helper 1 and T helper 2 Cell Polarization. Immunity, 2013; 38 (6): 1271 DOI: 10.1016/j.immuni.2013.05.011

Cite This Page:

Suomen Akatemia (Academy of Finland). "Scientists discover new mechanism regulating the immune response." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 28 June 2013. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/06/130628092117.htm>.
Suomen Akatemia (Academy of Finland). (2013, June 28). Scientists discover new mechanism regulating the immune response. ScienceDaily. Retrieved September 20, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/06/130628092117.htm
Suomen Akatemia (Academy of Finland). "Scientists discover new mechanism regulating the immune response." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/06/130628092117.htm (accessed September 20, 2014).

Share This



More Health & Medicine News

Saturday, September 20, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Changes Found In Brain After One Dose Of Antidepressants

Changes Found In Brain After One Dose Of Antidepressants

Newsy (Sep. 19, 2014) — A study suggest antidepressants can kick in much sooner than previously thought. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Could Grief Affect The Immune Systems Of Senior Citizens?

Could Grief Affect The Immune Systems Of Senior Citizens?

Newsy (Sep. 19, 2014) — The study found elderly people are much more likely to become susceptible to infection than younger adults going though a similar situation. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Jury Delivers Verdict in Salmonella Trial

Jury Delivers Verdict in Salmonella Trial

AP (Sep. 19, 2014) — A federal jury has convicted three people in connection with an outbreak of salmonella poisoning five years ago that sickened hundreds of people and was linked to a number of deaths. (Sept. 19) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
How The 'Angelina Jolie Effect' Increased Cancer Screenings

How The 'Angelina Jolie Effect' Increased Cancer Screenings

Newsy (Sep. 19, 2014) — Angelina's Jolie's decision to undergo a preventative mastectomy in 2013 inspired many women to seek early screenings for the disease. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
 
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:  

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:  

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile iPhone Android Web
Follow Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins