Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

DNA particles in the blood may help speed detection of coronary artery disease

Date:
July 1, 2013
Source:
American Heart Association
Summary:
DNA fragments in your blood may someday help doctors quickly learn if chest pain means you have narrowed heart arteries, according to a new study.

DNA fragments in your blood may someday help doctors quickly learn if chest pain means you have narrowed heart arteries, according to a new study published in the American Heart Association journal Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis, and Vascular Biology.

Related Articles


The study involved 282 patients, ages 34 to 83, who reported chest pain and were suspected of having coronary artery disease. Researchers used computed tomography imaging to look for hardened, or calcified, buildup in the blood vessels that supply the heart. Blood samples also were tested for bits of genetic material. Release of small DNA particles in the blood occurs during chronic inflammatory conditions such as coronary artery disease.

Higher levels of DNA particles in the blood were linked to high levels of coronary artery calcium deposits. These particles are potentially markers of disease, and may eventually help identify patients with severely narrowed coronary arteries, predict how many coronary vessels were affected, and even whether a patient is likely to suffer a serious heart problem or heart-related death.

"If those markers are proven to be effective -- specific and sensitive -- they may improve medical care in terms of identifying patients at risk sooner," said Julian Borissoff, M.D., Ph.D., lead author of the study and postdoctoral research fellow at Boston Children's Hospital and Harvard Medical School. "And so the patients may go on treatment sooner."

The scientists noted that larger studies, following more patients for longer periods, are needed to see how precisely these markers might identify patients at risk for developing coronary artery disease. Almost half of the patients studied were followed for a year and a half or longer.

If the markers do pan out, they have the potential to help doctors efficiently pinpoint which patients with chest pain are likely to have coronary artery disease rather than some other problem causing the discomfort, Borissoff said. Currently, a time-consuming and costly battery of tests is used to determine whether the heart is at risk, he said.

It is plausible to think that the DNA particles themselves might contribute to the progression of atherosclerosis and the risk of dangerous blood vessel blockages, the study's authors wrote. "The more the ongoing cell death, which is normal with inflammation, the more DNA enters the circulation and more plaque builds up," Borissoff said. "Cells get damaged, and the products released from the damaged cells can cause even more damage and inflammatory responses."

The researchers are testing the DNA particle components further, he said, to see which ones are most sensitive and to understand more about how their levels might vary -- for instance, during different stages of progression of atherosclerosis, or during a treadmill test, or after treatment for a heart attack.

Co-authors are Ivo A. Joosen, M.D., Mathijs O. Versteylen, M.D.; Alexander Brill, M.D., Ph.D.; Tobias A. Fuchs, Ph.D.; Alexander S. Savchenko, M.D., Ph.D.; Maureen Gallant, B.S.; Kimberly Martinod, B.A., B.S.; Hugo ten Cate, M.D., Ph.D.; Leonard Hofstra, M.D., Ph.D.; Harry J. Crijns, M.D., Ph.D.; Denisa D. Wagner, Ph.D.; Bas L.J.H. Kietselaer, M.D., Ph.D.

The Netherlands Heart Foundation supported the study.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by American Heart Association. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Julian I. Borissoff, Ivo A. Joosen, Mathijs O. Versteylen, Alexander Brill, Tobias A. Fuchs, Alexander S. Savchenko, Maureen Gallant, Kimberly Martinod, Hugo ten Cate, Leonard Hofstra, Harry J. Crijns, Denisa D. Wagner, and Bas L.J.H. Kietselaer. Elevated Levels of Circulating DNA and Chromatin Are Independently Associated With Severe Coronary Atherosclerosis and a Prothrombotic State. Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis, and Vascular Biology, 2013; DOI: 10.1161/ATVBAHA.113.301627

Cite This Page:

American Heart Association. "DNA particles in the blood may help speed detection of coronary artery disease." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 1 July 2013. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/07/130701080933.htm>.
American Heart Association. (2013, July 1). DNA particles in the blood may help speed detection of coronary artery disease. ScienceDaily. Retrieved November 26, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/07/130701080933.htm
American Heart Association. "DNA particles in the blood may help speed detection of coronary artery disease." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/07/130701080933.htm (accessed November 26, 2014).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Health & Medicine News

Wednesday, November 26, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

From Popcorn To Vending Snacks: FDA Ups Calorie Count Rules

From Popcorn To Vending Snacks: FDA Ups Calorie Count Rules

Newsy (Nov. 25, 2014) — The US FDA is announcing new calorie rules on Tuesday that will require everywhere from theaters to vending machines to include calorie counts. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Daily Serving Of Yogurt Could Reduce Risk Of Type 2 Diabetes

Daily Serving Of Yogurt Could Reduce Risk Of Type 2 Diabetes

Newsy (Nov. 25, 2014) — Need another reason to eat yogurt every day? Researchers now say it could reduce a person's risk of developing type 2 diabetes. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Madagascar Working to Contain Plague Outbreak

Madagascar Working to Contain Plague Outbreak

AFP (Nov. 24, 2014) — Madagascar said Monday it is trying to contain an outbreak of plague -- similar to the Black Death that swept Medieval Europe -- that has killed 40 people and is spreading to the capital Antananarivo. Duration: 00:42 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Are Female Bosses More Likely To Be Depressed?

Are Female Bosses More Likely To Be Depressed?

Newsy (Nov. 24, 2014) — A new study links greater authority with increased depressive symptoms among women in the workplace. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
 
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:  

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories

 

Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:  

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile iPhone Android Web
Follow Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins