Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Superconductor created from solvent

Date:
July 1, 2013
Source:
Washington State University
Summary:
Researchers have turned a fairly common non-metallic solvent into a superconductor capable of transmitting electrical current with none of the resistance seen in conventional conductors.

A study led by Washington State University researchers has turned a fairly common non-metallic solvent into a superconductor capable of transmitting electrical current with none of the resistance seen in conventional conductors.

Related Articles


"It is an important discovery that will attract a lot of attention from many scientific communities -- physics, chemistry, and materials science," said Choong-Shik Yoo, a professor of chemistry and Institute for Shock Physics. The National Science Foundation-funded discovery, which grows out of research by Yoo doctoral student Ranga Dias, appears in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

The field of superconductivity has a wide variety of potentially revolutionary applications, including powerful electromagnets, vehicle propulsion, power storage and vastly more efficient power transmission.

Three years ago, Yoo used super-high pressures similar to those found deep in Earth to turn a white crystal into a "super battery," or what he called "the most condensed form of energy storage outside of nuclear energy."

This time, Yoo saw how carbon disulfide subjected to high pressure and cold started to act like a metal, taking on properties like magnetism, a high energy density, and superhardness as its molecules reassembled in three-dimensional structures like those found in diamonds.

Typically, non-metallic molecules are too far apart from each other-three times farther apart than metal molecules -- for electrical energy to move across them. But Yoo and his colleagues, including researchers at the Carnegie Institution of

Washington, compressed the compound in the small, compact space of a diamond anvil cell to 50,000 atmospheres, a pressure equivalent to that found 600 miles into Earth. They also chilled the compound to 6.5 degrees Kelvin, or nearly -447 F.

The pressure and temperature not only brought the carbon disulfide molecules together but rearranged them into a lattice structure in which the natural vibrations of the molecules can help electrons move so well the material becomes a resistance-free superconductor.

Yoo's research provides new insight into how superconductivity works in unconventional materials, an area that has intrigued scientists for several decades, he says. These unconventional materials are typically made of atoms with lower atomic weights that let them vibrate at higher frequencies, increasing their potential as superconductors at higher temperatures.

Yoo acknowledges that electronic materials are not about to be cooled to near absolute zero or subjected to extreme pressures. But he said this work could point the way to creating similar properties under more ordinary conditions, much as science paved the way to make synthetic diamonds at lower temperatures and pressures.

"This research will provide the vehicle for people to be clever in developing superconductors by understanding the fundamentals that guide them," said Yoo.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Washington State University. The original article was written by Eric Sorensen. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Ranga P. Dias, Choong-Shik Yoo, Viktor V. Struzhkin, Minseob Kim, Takaki Muramatsu, Takahiro Matsuoka, Yasuo Ohishi, and Stanislav Sinogeikin. Superconductivity in highly disordered dense carbon disulfide. PNAS, July 1, 2013 DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1305129110

Cite This Page:

Washington State University. "Superconductor created from solvent." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 1 July 2013. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/07/130701151600.htm>.
Washington State University. (2013, July 1). Superconductor created from solvent. ScienceDaily. Retrieved March 1, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/07/130701151600.htm
Washington State University. "Superconductor created from solvent." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/07/130701151600.htm (accessed March 1, 2015).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Matter & Energy News

Sunday, March 1, 2015

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Elon Musk's Hyperloop Moves Forward

Elon Musk's Hyperloop Moves Forward

Buzz60 (Feb. 27, 2015) Zipping around at 800-miles an hour is coming closer to reality in California. An entire town is being built around Elon Musk&apos;s Hyperloop concept and it wants you to stop in for a ride when it&apos;s ready. Brett Larson is on board. Video provided by Buzz60
Powered by NewsLook.com
Vibrating Bicycle Senses Traffic

Vibrating Bicycle Senses Traffic

Reuters - Innovations Video Online (Feb. 26, 2015) Dutch scientists have developed a smart bicycle that uses sensors, wireless technology and video to warn riders of traffic dangers. Ben Gruber reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
In Japan, Robot Dogs Are for Life -- And Death

In Japan, Robot Dogs Are for Life -- And Death

AFP (Feb. 25, 2015) Robot dogs are the perfect pet for some in Japan who go to repairmen-turned-vets when their pooch breaks down - while a full Buddhist funeral ceremony awaits those who don&apos;t make it. Duration: 02:40 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
London Show Dissects History of Forensic Science

London Show Dissects History of Forensic Science

AFP (Feb. 25, 2015) Forensic science, which has fascinated generations with its unravelling of gruesome crime mysteries, is being put under the microscope in an exhibition of real criminal investigations in London. Duration: 00:53 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Space & Time

Matter & Energy

Computers & Math

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins