Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Smallest puzzle in the world

Date:
July 15, 2013
Source:
Karlsruhe Institute of Technology
Summary:
Researchers have created three puzzle pieces of less than 1 mm in size each that may be put together to make what is likely the smallest puzzle in the world. For production, researchers used a new process to manufacture microstructured casting molds. Inexpensive series production is combined with highest precision on the microscale to produce such things as components for watches, engines, or medical products. Now, large series of smallest parts can be injection-molded with the highest accuracy. 

Puzzle composed of three plastic microparts produced by the LIGA2.X process.
Credit: Jochen Heneka, KIT

Researchers have created three puzzle pieces of less than 1 mm in size each that may be put together to make what is likely the smallest puzzle in the world. For production, researchers used LIGA2.X, a new process to manufacture microstructured casting molds at KIT's ANKA synchrotron source. Inexpensive series production is combined with highest precision on the microscale to produce e.g. components in watches, engines, or medical products. Now, large series of smallest parts can be injection-molded with the highest accuracy.

The LIGA process can be used to produce microstructures from various metals, ceramics, or plastics. The acronym stands for lithography, electrodeposition, and molding. LIGA allows to produce structures with high aspect ratios (ratio between height and smallest width) and opens up various molding options. The process developed in the 1980s in Karlsruhe is subject to constant further development. Now, KIT scientists have conceived a new modification of the LIGA process. .

The LIGA2.X process allows for an inexpensive series production of plastic microparts of less than 0.5 mm3 in volume. So far, a substrate plate linking all molded parts has been required for demolding. LIGA2.X does without this layer and allows for direct and separate injection molding of such microparts. Difficult time- and cost-consuming separation of the parts from the substrate plate is no longer needed. "LIGA2.X does not only reduce costs, but also ensures higher degrees of freedom in the arrangement of structured mold nests in multiple molds," explains Jochen Heneka, scientist at the Institute of Microstructure Technology (IMT) and Institute for Applied Materials -- Material Process Technology (IAM-WPT) of KIT.

The injection molding tools applied in LIGA2.X consist of three plates to demold the parts from the molds and four LIGA molds that can be installed in a tool plate and exchanged. By moving the first and second molding plate away from each other, the part is released from the LIGA mold. With the help of the third plate, the gate is removed properly. To produce the microstructured LIGA molds with the help of X-ray deep-etch lithography, the scientists used the ANKA synchrotron source on the Campus North of KIT.

Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) is a public corporation according to the legislation of the state of Baden-Wόrttemberg. It fulfills the mission of a university and the mission of a national research center of the Helmholtz Association. Research activities focus on energy, the natural and built environment as well as on society and technology and cover the whole range extending from fundamental aspects to application. With about 9000 employees, including nearly 6000 staff members in the science and education sector, and 24000 students, KIT is one of the biggest research and education institutions in Europe. Work of KIT is based on the knowledge triangle of research, teaching, and innovation.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Karlsruhe Institute of Technology. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Karlsruhe Institute of Technology. "Smallest puzzle in the world." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 15 July 2013. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/07/130715070304.htm>.
Karlsruhe Institute of Technology. (2013, July 15). Smallest puzzle in the world. ScienceDaily. Retrieved July 30, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/07/130715070304.htm
Karlsruhe Institute of Technology. "Smallest puzzle in the world." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/07/130715070304.htm (accessed July 30, 2014).

Share This




More Matter & Energy News

Wednesday, July 30, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Climate Change Could Cost Billions, According To White House

Climate Change Could Cost Billions, According To White House

Newsy (July 29, 2014) — A report from the White House warns not curbing greenhouse gas emissions could cost the U.S. billions. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Stranded Whale Watching Boat Returns to Boston

Stranded Whale Watching Boat Returns to Boston

Reuters - US Online Video (July 29, 2014) — Passengers stuck overnight on a whale watching boat return safely to Boston. Linda So reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Baluchistan Mining Eyes an Uncertain Future

Baluchistan Mining Eyes an Uncertain Future

AFP (July 29, 2014) — Coal mining is one of the major industries in Baluchistan but a lack of infrastructure and frequent accidents mean that the area has yet to hit its potential. Duration: 01:58 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Easier Nuclear Construction Promises Fall Short

Easier Nuclear Construction Promises Fall Short

AP (July 29, 2014) — The U.S. nuclear industry started building its first new plants using prefabricated Lego-like blocks meant to save time and prevent the cost overruns that crippled the sector decades ago. So far, it's not working. (July 29) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
 
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:  

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:  

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile iPhone Android Web
Follow Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins