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Women who were physically abused during childhood more likely to be obese

Date:
August 13, 2013
Source:
University of Toronto
Summary:
Women with a history of childhood physical abuse are more likely to become obese adults, according to a new study.

Women with a history of childhood physical abuse are more likely to become obese adults, according to a new study by University of Toronto researchers.

Results indicate that women who were physically abused in childhood were more likely to be obese than women from non-abusive homes.

“After adjusting for age and race, childhood physical abuse was associated with 47% higher odds of obesity for women” says lead author Esme Fuller-Thomson, Professor and Sandra Rotman Endowed Chair in the University of Toronto's Factor-Inwentash Faculty of Social Work. “Among men, obesity wasn’t associated with childhood physical abuse.”

“We had anticipated that the association between childhood physical abuse and obesity among women would be explained by factors including depression and anxiety, adult socio-economic position, alcohol abuse, and other childhood adversities, such as having a parent addicted to drugs or alcohol,” says study co-author and doctoral student Deborah Sinclair. “However, even after taking into account all these factors, women from physically abusive families still had 35% higher odds of obesity.”

The study could not determine the reason for the relationship between childhood physical abuse and women’s obesity. “It is unclear why childhood physical abuse is associated with adult obesity among women but not men; it may reflect gender differences in coping mechanisms,” says study co-author and doctoral candidate Sarah Brennenstuhl.

This research appears online this month in the journal Obesity Facts. Researchers examined the association between childhood physical abuse and adult obesity in a representative sample of 12,590 adults, drawn from the 2005 Canadian Community Health Survey. Of these, 976 reported being physically abused by someone close to them before they turned 18 and 2,786 were classified as “obese" based on a body mass index of 30 or greater which was calculated from self-report of respondents’ height and weight.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University of Toronto. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Esme Fuller-Thomson, Deborah A. Sinclair, Sarah Brennenstuhl. Carrying the Pain of Abuse: Gender-Specific Findings on the Relationship between Childhood Physical Abuse and Obesity in Adulthood. Obesity Facts, 2013; 6 (4): 325 DOI: 10.1159/000354609

Cite This Page:

University of Toronto. "Women who were physically abused during childhood more likely to be obese." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 13 August 2013. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/08/130813111732.htm>.
University of Toronto. (2013, August 13). Women who were physically abused during childhood more likely to be obese. ScienceDaily. Retrieved April 17, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/08/130813111732.htm
University of Toronto. "Women who were physically abused during childhood more likely to be obese." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/08/130813111732.htm (accessed April 17, 2014).

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