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Dieting for obese mothers just before pregnancy may not be enough

Date:
August 29, 2013
Source:
Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology
Summary:
If you are obese, and hoping to lose weight before conception, some of the epigenetic damage might have already been done. New research shows that not only is dieting before getting pregnant not enough to prevent diabetes risks, but could actually present new risks as well. Knowing how maternal health and behavior affects how genes express themselves in offspring should help develop more precise prenatal strategies to maximize the health of newborn children.

While there is never a bad time to address one's own obesity, if you're hoping to lose weight before conception for the sake of your child, here's some bad news: Some of the epigenetic damage might have already been done, even if you lose the weight just before conception.

According to new research published in the September 2013 issue of The FASEB Journal, not only is dieting before getting pregnant not enough to prevent diabetes risks, but it could actually present new risks as well. Knowing how maternal health and behavior affect how genes express themselves in offspring should help health care providers and public health officials develop more precise prenatal strategies to maximize the health of newborn children.

"The findings of our study highlight that the nutritional health of the mother in the lead-up to and around conception can result in poor metabolic consequences for the offspring that will persist into later life," said Caroline McMillen, M.D., Ph.D., a researcher involved in the work from the Sansom Institute for Health Research at the University of South Australia. "We hope that the findings of the present study will lead to a focus on how to help obese women lose weight in order to improve their fertility in a manner which does not impact negatively on the health outcomes of their offspring."

To make this discovery, McMillen and colleagues examined the embryos conceived in four groups of female sheep. The first group of sheep was overnourished from four months before conception, until one week after conception. The second group of sheep was overnourished for three months and then placed on a diet for one month before and one week after conception. The third group of sheep was placed on a normal or control diet from four months before conception, until one week after conception. The fourth group was fed a control diet for three months and then these normal weight sheep were placed on a diet for one month before conception, until one week after conception. One week after conception, embryos from all of these sheep were transferred to normal weight, normally nourished sheep for the remainder of pregnancy. Liver samples were taken from the lambs born to these ewes at four months of age to examine their genes and proteins.

"This discovery helps us to understand how body weight affects our health and the health of our children -- right down to the genetic level," said Gerald Weissmann, M.D., Editor-in-Chief of The FASEB Journal. "Clearly this effect in must be confirmed in humans, but the study should help us to optimize a hopeful mom's management of how and when to lose weight to have a healthy child."


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. L. M. Nicholas, L. Rattanatray, S. M. MacLaughlin, S. E. Ozanne, D. O. Kleemann, S. K. Walker, J. L. Morrison, S. Zhang, B. S. Muhlhausler, M. S. Martin-Gronert, I. C. McMillen. Differential effects of maternal obesity and weight loss in the periconceptional period on the epigenetic regulation of hepatic insulin-signaling pathways in the offspring. The FASEB Journal, 2013; 27 (9): 3786 DOI: 10.1096/fj.13-227918

Cite This Page:

Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology. "Dieting for obese mothers just before pregnancy may not be enough." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 29 August 2013. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/08/130829110419.htm>.
Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology. (2013, August 29). Dieting for obese mothers just before pregnancy may not be enough. ScienceDaily. Retrieved October 20, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/08/130829110419.htm
Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology. "Dieting for obese mothers just before pregnancy may not be enough." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/08/130829110419.htm (accessed October 20, 2014).

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