Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Plastics from renewable raw materials: Body automatically breaks down implants

Date:
September 18, 2013
Source:
TU Graz
Summary:
Researchers have managed to develop absorbable implants to promote bone healing which are broken down by the body.  In this way, painful multiple operations – especially in children – can be avoided in the future.

Researchers from Graz University of Technology, together with colleagues from the Medical University of Graz, Vienna University of Technology and the University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences, Vienna, have managed to develop absorbable implants to promote bone healing which are broken down by the body. In this way, painful multiple operations -- especially in children -- can be avoided in the future. The "BRIC -- BioResorbable Implants for Children" project, funded by the Austrian Research Promotion Agency (FFG), was successfully completed at the end of August.

Related Articles


The goal was finally achieved after four years of research. Scientists from Graz University of Technology and their colleagues in Graz and Vienna finally concluded the development stage of the BRIC -- Bio Resorbable Implants for Children project. Bioresorbable implants are implants that are resorbed by the body over time. In contrast to traditional implants, such as plates, screws or pins, which have to be surgically removed after a certain time, bioresorbable implants do not have to be surgically removed. The BRICs are to be used in children, who suffer particularly from each surgical intervention.

Detailed work over many years was necessary for the success of this development. The project was co-ordinated by Dr Annelie Weinberg at the Department of Paediatric Surgery in Graz. Apart from the Medical University of Graz, the project consortium on the academic side consisted of two working groups made up by Graz University of Technology, Vienna University of Technology, and even the University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences, Vienna. The participation of partners AT&S and Heraeus demonstrates the great interest shown by industry in the results.

No negative affects on the body

The two Graz University of Technology teams led by Martin Koller, responsible for the biotechnology part, and Franz Stelzer, whose team processed the biopolymers into implants, managed to develop microbial biopolyesters -- so-called polyhydroxyalkanoates, known as PHAs, which can be processed into implants. "The production is completely independent of fossil resources, so there are no negative affects on the body. The implant is produced by bacteria and can be absorbed by the human body after it has fulfilled its task," said Martin Koller. Alternative biopolymers, such as polylactic acid, in contrast to PHAs, lead to a hyperacidity of the organism and bring about chronic inflammation. PHAs, on the other hand, are high-grade materials whose biotechnological production is based on renewable raw materials.

Another advantage of the new implants is that they are more biocompatible than the previously used steel or titanium materials and thus promote the bone healing process. Furthermore, the speed of their breakdown by the body can be controlled by means of the implant's precise composition. The breakdown of the implant should take place at the same speed as the bone heals. The materials are in the development stage and their material properties and biodegradation rates are currently being tested.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by TU Graz. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

TU Graz. "Plastics from renewable raw materials: Body automatically breaks down implants." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 18 September 2013. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/09/130918090801.htm>.
TU Graz. (2013, September 18). Plastics from renewable raw materials: Body automatically breaks down implants. ScienceDaily. Retrieved October 25, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/09/130918090801.htm
TU Graz. "Plastics from renewable raw materials: Body automatically breaks down implants." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/09/130918090801.htm (accessed October 25, 2014).

Share This



More Health & Medicine News

Saturday, October 25, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Texas Nurse Nina Pham Cured of Ebola

Texas Nurse Nina Pham Cured of Ebola

AFP (Oct. 25, 2014) — An American nurse who contracted Ebola while caring for a Liberian patient in Texas has been declared free of the virus and will leave the hospital. Duration: 01:01 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
IKEA Desk Converts From Standing to Sitting With One Button

IKEA Desk Converts From Standing to Sitting With One Button

Buzz60 (Oct. 24, 2014) — IKEA is out with a new convertible desk that can convert from a sitting desk to a standing one with just the push of a button. Jen Markham explains. Video provided by Buzz60
Powered by NewsLook.com
Ebola Protective Suits Being Made in China

Ebola Protective Suits Being Made in China

AFP (Oct. 24, 2014) — A factory in China is busy making Ebola protective suits for healthcare workers and others fighting the spread of the virus. Duration: 00:38 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
WHO: Millions of Ebola Vaccine Doses by 2015

WHO: Millions of Ebola Vaccine Doses by 2015

AP (Oct. 24, 2014) — The World Health Organization said on Friday that millions of doses of two experimental Ebola vaccines could be ready for use in 2015 and five more experimental vaccines would start being tested in March. (Oct. 24) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
 
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:  

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories

 

Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:  

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile iPhone Android Web
Follow Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins