Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Falls don’t have to be part of getting older

Date:
October 1, 2013
Source:
Manchester University
Summary:
Falls, and the injuries they cause, are not an inevitable part of aging. According to researchers, there are many things that can be done to prevent falls.

Falls, and the injuries they cause, are not an inevitable part of aging. According to researchers from The University of Manchester there are many things that can be done to prevent falls.

Related Articles


Falls are the leading cause of fatal injuries among older people, but experts from across Europe argue they should not just be written off as an unavoidable consequence of aging. Research shows that there are plenty of things people can do to prevent falls escalating with age.

The University of Manchester is part of ProFouND: the Prevention of Falls Network for Dissemination -- a European Commission-funded network aiming to introduce best practice in falls prevention and make available simple interventions to help prevent falls among older people.

Dr Emma Stanmore, from The School of Nursing, Midwifery and Social Work at The University of Manchester, said: "Many people wrongly think that falls are just a part of aging and something to be expected as you get older which is not true. But this misunderstanding is not surprising as falls happen so often -- around a third of people over-65 and half of those over 80 will fall every year.

"To tie in with International Day of Older Persons day on 1 October, we want to raise awareness among older people, their relatives and organisations that work with older people that falls can be predicted and prevented using some simple methods."

Professor Chris Todd, from The University of Manchester who is the leader of the ProFouND network, said: "There is very strong scientific evidence that we can prevent falls among older people. For example, strength and balance exercises can protect against falls, but these should be done with professional guidance to ensure they are suitable and to maximise their effectiveness. "We have brought together the ProFouND network funded by the EC, which is supporting the European Innovation Partnership on Active and Healthy aging by making training material available across EU to help reduce the numbers of falls suffered by older people in Europe."

Dr Stanmore added: "You should minimise the amount of time spent sitting and being sedentary for extended periods -- in fact older adults should aim to be active daily and do 150 minutes of moderate intensity activity in bouts of 10 minutes or more each week.

"If you have any medical conditions, this really should be done after checking the advice of a health professional. Why not try visiting your local library to find out about exercise classes close to you, like Tai Chi. Many health authorities have information on sessions that aim to improve strength and balance, or look at the NHS falls prevention page on the internet."

Research shows the risk of falls is increased if an older person has a history of falls, has problems with walking, uses a walking aid or has certain conditions including a previous stroke, Parkinson's disease, dementia or arthritis. Falls risk can also be increased if an older person takes four or more medications, have a fear of falling, problems with continence, poor vision or strength and balance problems. People with a history of falls should talk to a health professional about local falls services that might help them and ask to have the doctor or pharmacist review their medications.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Manchester University. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Manchester University. "Falls don’t have to be part of getting older." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 1 October 2013. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/10/131001091214.htm>.
Manchester University. (2013, October 1). Falls don’t have to be part of getting older. ScienceDaily. Retrieved March 1, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/10/131001091214.htm
Manchester University. "Falls don’t have to be part of getting older." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/10/131001091214.htm (accessed March 1, 2015).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Health & Medicine News

Sunday, March 1, 2015

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Rehab Robot Helps Restore Damaged Muscles and Nerves

Rehab Robot Helps Restore Damaged Muscles and Nerves

Reuters - Innovations Video Online (Mar. 1, 2015) A rehabilitation robot prototype to help restore deteriorated nerves and muscles using electromyography and computer games. Ben Gruber reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Could a $34 Smartphone Device Improve HIV Diagnosis in Africa?

Could a $34 Smartphone Device Improve HIV Diagnosis in Africa?

Reuters - Innovations Video Online (Feb. 27, 2015) A dongle that plugs into a Smartphone mimics a lab-based blood test for HIV and syphilis and can detect the diseases in 15 minutes, say researchers. Tara Cleary reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Doctor Says Head Transplants Possible Within Two Years

Doctor Says Head Transplants Possible Within Two Years

Buzz60 (Feb. 27, 2015) An Italian doctor is saying he could stick someone&apos;s head onto someone else&apos;s body. Patrick Jones (@Patrick_E_Jones) reports. Video provided by Buzz60
Powered by NewsLook.com
How Your Dentist Could Help Screen You For Diabetes

How Your Dentist Could Help Screen You For Diabetes

Newsy (Feb. 27, 2015) A new study from researchers at New York University suggests dentists could soon use blood samples taken from patients&apos; mouths to test for diabetes. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins