Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Innovative concept for knee cartilage treatment

Date:
October 9, 2013
Source:
Schweizerischer Nationalfonds zur Foerderung der wissenschaftlichen Forschung
Summary:
Researchers have developed a material that can be used for the controlled release of a substance when subjected to cyclic mechanical loading. This work, carried out within the context of the National Research Programme “Smart Materials," offers a potential treatment method for specific tissues such as knee cartilage.

Researchers have developed a material that can be used for the controlled release of a substance when subjected to cyclic mechanical loading. This work, carried out within the context of the National Research Programme "Smart Materials" (NRP 62), offers a potential treatment method for specific tissues such as knee cartilage.

In order to regenerate, knee cartilage, paradoxically, needs to be placed under mechanical stress, as happens whenever we take a step and our knees take our weight. When stimulated in this way, the cartilage cells develop receptors that are sensitive to the growth factors produced by the organism. It is also at this very moment that they would be most receptive to medication. Working on this basis, Dominique Pioletti and Harm-Anton Klok from EPF Lausanne have developed a smart material that only releases a substance when the material is mechanically loaded.

Threshold effect

As they describe in a recent publication, their material takes the form of a hydrogel matrix, liposome-type nanoparticles and, finally, a payload -- in this case a dye. When subjected to cyclic mechanical loading, the hydrogel matrix heats up. Once subjected to heat, the diameter of the liposomes shrinks significantly. This frees up space in the matrix, increasing its permeability and facilitating the release of the dye from the matrix. "One of the main difficulties has been the development of nanoparticles that respond to our specification," explains Dominique Pioletti. "Basically, for the concept to work, their response to the heating process must have a very clear threshold between the two to three degrees that separate the static and stimulated states."

The researchers then wanted to verify that it was actually the heating process resulting from the repetition of the mechanical loading that caused the dye to be released. During an initial experiment, the material was subjected to cyclic mechanical loading but the heat produced was evacuated in order to prevent any local temperature increase in the material. "This test enabled us to exclude a sponge-type function, whereby the dye was only being released as a result of the pressure," explains Dominique Pioletti. During a second experiment, the nanoparticles were removed. The matrix heated up as expected due to the cyclic mechanical loading but none of the dye was released. The researchers concluded that the three elements of the composite material were required for the system as a whole to function as intended.

Long-term prospects Whilst the researchers have been able to demonstrate the validity of their concept, Dominique Pioletti stresses that a future treatment is still a long way off. "First of all we need to develop a hydrogel and nanoparticles that are safe and biodegradable, before progressing to clinical trials. And, above all, we need to find partners interested in investing in our project."


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Schweizerischer Nationalfonds zur Foerderung der wissenschaftlichen Forschung. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Mohamadreza Nassajian Moghadam, Vitaliy Kolesov, Arne Vogel, Harm-Anton Klok, Dominique P. Pioletti. Controlled release from a mechanically-stimulated thermosensitive self-heating composite hydrogel. Biomaterials, 2013; DOI: 10.1016/j.biomaterials.2013.09.065

Cite This Page:

Schweizerischer Nationalfonds zur Foerderung der wissenschaftlichen Forschung. "Innovative concept for knee cartilage treatment." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 9 October 2013. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/10/131009095954.htm>.
Schweizerischer Nationalfonds zur Foerderung der wissenschaftlichen Forschung. (2013, October 9). Innovative concept for knee cartilage treatment. ScienceDaily. Retrieved September 2, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/10/131009095954.htm
Schweizerischer Nationalfonds zur Foerderung der wissenschaftlichen Forschung. "Innovative concept for knee cartilage treatment." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/10/131009095954.htm (accessed September 2, 2014).

Share This




More Matter & Energy News

Tuesday, September 2, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Australian Airlines Relax Phone Ban Too

Australian Airlines Relax Phone Ban Too

Reuters - Business Video Online (Aug. 26, 2014) Qantas and Virgin say passengers can use their smartphones and tablets throughout flights after a regulator relaxed a ban on electronic devices during take-off and landing. As Hayley Platt reports the move comes as the two domestic rivals are expected to post annual net losses later this week. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Hurricane Marie Brings Big Waves to California Coast

Hurricane Marie Brings Big Waves to California Coast

Reuters - US Online Video (Aug. 26, 2014) Huge waves generated by Hurricane Marie hit the Southern California coast. Rough Cut (no reporter narration). Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Chinese Researchers Might Be Creating Supersonic Submarine

Chinese Researchers Might Be Creating Supersonic Submarine

Newsy (Aug. 26, 2014) Chinese researchers have expanded on Cold War-era tech and are closer to building a submarine that could reach the speed of sound. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Breakingviews: India Coal Strained by Supreme Court Ruling

Breakingviews: India Coal Strained by Supreme Court Ruling

Reuters - Business Video Online (Aug. 26, 2014) An acute coal shortage is likely to be aggravated as India's supreme court declared government coal allocations illegal, says Breakingviews' Peter Thal Larsen. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins