Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Most stroke victims not being seen by doctors within the recommended timeframe

Date:
October 14, 2013
Source:
Oxford University Press (OUP)
Summary:
In a study of over 270 patients newly diagnosed with minor strokes or transient ischaemic attack (TIA), only a minority sought medical help within the timeframe recommended by the Royal College of Physicians. This is despite the high profile FAST campaign, which was taking place at the time that the study was conducted.

In a study, published online today in the journal Age and Ageing, of over 270 patients newly diagnosed with minor strokes or transient ischaemic attack (TIA), only a minority sought medical help within the timeframe recommended by the Royal College of Physicians. This is despite the high profile FAST campaign, which was taking place at the time that the study was conducted.

Rapid assessment and treatment of patients with TIA or minor stroke reduces the risk of early recurrent stroke. The Royal College of Physicians' Guidelines suggests that TIA patients who are deemed high-risk should be seen within 24 hours of the onset of symptoms, while those at lower risk should be seen within a week.

A team of researchers led by Professor Andrew Wilson of the University of Leicester interviewed 278 patients from a TIA rapid response clinic who had been newly diagnosed with TIA or minor stroke between 1 December 2008 and 30 April 2010. Of those 278, 222 were diagnosed with TIA and 56 with stroke. The patients were interviewed about the onset of their symptoms, seeking help, their first consultation with a health care professional, attendance at the TIA clinic, and any additional contact with health care professionals before clinic attendance.

There were 133 TIA patients who were assessed as high-risk. Of these, only 11 (8%) attended the TIA clinic within 24 hours. Of the 89 low-risk TIA patients, 47 (53%) attended the clinic within the recommended 7 days.

Professor Wilson said: "Factors contributing to delay include incorrect interpretation of symptoms and failure to contact the emergency services, which demonstrates an on-going need for patient education. Despite the FAST campaign, which was taking place at the time of the study, only 60% of the patients we interviewed reported a FAST symptom, which is actually fewer than in some other studies."

The FAST campaign promoted awareness of Face or Arm weakness, Speech difficulty, Time to call 999.

The researchers also found that service factors contributed to a delay in referral to the TIA clinic. Most of the patients who first consulted an out-of-hours GP, and all who consulted an optometrist, experienced a further consultation before clinic attendance, usually with a GP.

Professor Wilson and his team, from the University of Leicester's Department of Health Sciences, recommend that services could be streamlined to encourage clinic referral, as well as continued education for patients themselves: "Patients are encourage to respond urgently to symptoms, but when they do so, a significant number are then referred back to their GP. Our findings suggest that referral pathways from emergency departments and acute medical units could be improved."


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Oxford University Press (OUP). Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. A. D. Wilson, D. Coleby, N. A. Taub, C. Weston, T. G. Robinson. Delay between symptom onset and clinic attendance following TIA and minor stroke: the BEATS study. Age and Ageing, 2013; DOI: 10.1093/ageing/aft144

Cite This Page:

Oxford University Press (OUP). "Most stroke victims not being seen by doctors within the recommended timeframe." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 14 October 2013. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/10/131014221539.htm>.
Oxford University Press (OUP). (2013, October 14). Most stroke victims not being seen by doctors within the recommended timeframe. ScienceDaily. Retrieved August 30, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/10/131014221539.htm
Oxford University Press (OUP). "Most stroke victims not being seen by doctors within the recommended timeframe." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/10/131014221539.htm (accessed August 30, 2014).

Share This




More Health & Medicine News

Saturday, August 30, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

3 Things To Know About The Ebola Outbreak's Progression

3 Things To Know About The Ebola Outbreak's Progression

Newsy (Aug. 29, 2014) Here are three things you need to know about the deadly Ebola outbreak's progression this week. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Killer Amoeba Found in Louisiana Water System

Killer Amoeba Found in Louisiana Water System

AP (Aug. 28, 2014) State health officials say testing has confirmed the presence of a killer amoeba in a water system serving three St. John the Baptist Parish towns. (Aug. 28) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Who Could Be Burnt by WHO's E-Cigs Move?

Who Could Be Burnt by WHO's E-Cigs Move?

Reuters - Business Video Online (Aug. 28, 2014) The World Health Organisation has called for the regulation of electronic cigarettes as both tobacco and medical products. Ciara Lee looks at the impact of the move on the tobacco industry. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
CDC Director On Ebola Outbreak: 'It's Worse Than I Feared'

CDC Director On Ebola Outbreak: 'It's Worse Than I Feared'

Newsy (Aug. 28, 2014) CDC director Tom Frieden says the Ebola outbreak is even worse than he feared. But he also said there's still hope to contain it. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins