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As chimpanzees grow, so does yawn contagion

Date:
October 16, 2013
Source:
Public Library of Science
Summary:
As sanctuary-kept chimpanzees grow from infant to juvenile, they develop increased susceptibility to human yawn contagion, possibility due to their increasing ability to empathize.

The ability to empathize may influence chimpanzees' susceptibility to contagious yawning.
Credit: © Stephen Meese / Fotolia

As sanctuary-kept chimpanzees grow from infant to juvenile, they develop increased susceptibility to human yawn contagion, possibility due to their increasing ability to empathize, says a study published October 16, 2013, in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Elainie Madsen and colleagues from Lund University.

Scientists examined the extent to which two factors affected chimpanzees' susceptibility to yawn contagion: their age, and their emotional closeness to the person yawning. Thirty-three orphaned chimpanzees, 12 infants 1 to 4 years old, and 21 juveniles 5 to 8 years old, were included in the trials. A trial sequence consisted of 7 five-minute sessions: a baseline session, followed by three experimental sessions, where the human repeatedly either yawned, gaped or nose-wiped, and three post-experimental sessions, where social interactions continued without the inclusion of the key behaviors. Each chimpanzee separately observed an unfamiliar human and a familiar human preforming the sequence.

Researchers found that yawning, but not nose-wiping, was contagious for juvenile chimpanzees, while infants found neither yawning nor nose-wiping contagious. Specifically, human yawning elicited 24 yawns from the juvenile chimpanzees and zero yawns from the infants. Chimpanzees appear to develop susceptibility to interspecies contagious yawning as they grow from infant to juvenile, possibly due to their developing ability to empathize with the person yawning. Emotional closeness with the yawning human did not affect contagion. Madsen added, "The results of the study reflect a general developmental pattern, shared by humans and other animals. Given that contagious yawning may be an empathetic response, the results can also be taken to mean that empathy develops slowly over the first years of a chimpanzee's life."

Aside from humans, cross-species yawn contagion and a gradual development yawn contagion, has previously only been demonstrated in dogs.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Public Library of Science. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Elainie Alenkζr Madsen, Tomas Persson, Susan Sayehli, Sara Lenninger, Gφran Sonesson. Chimpanzees Show a Developmental Increase in Susceptibility to Contagious Yawning: A Test of the Effect of Ontogeny and Emotional Closeness on Yawn Contagion. PLoS ONE, 2013; 8 (10): e76266 DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0076266

Cite This Page:

Public Library of Science. "As chimpanzees grow, so does yawn contagion." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 16 October 2013. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/10/131016213221.htm>.
Public Library of Science. (2013, October 16). As chimpanzees grow, so does yawn contagion. ScienceDaily. Retrieved September 17, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/10/131016213221.htm
Public Library of Science. "As chimpanzees grow, so does yawn contagion." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/10/131016213221.htm (accessed September 17, 2014).

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