Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Five-year-old children as likely to suffer from bilharzia as their mothers

Date:
October 17, 2013
Source:
Public Library of Science
Summary:
Children of women harboring the bilharzia (schistosomiasis) worm during pregnancy are more likely to suffer the infection by the age of five years, a new study has found.

Children of women harboring the bilharzia (schistosomiasis) worm during pregnancy are more likely to suffer the infection by the age of five years, a new study publishing October 17th, 2013 in the journal PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases has found.

Related Articles


The study was conducted by a team of researchers from the Uganda Virus Research Institute (UVRI), Makerere University, University of Cambridge and London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine (LSHTM) around the Entebbe peninsula of Lake Victoria in Uganda between 2005 and 2012.

Bilharzia is a disease caused by infection of blood flukes which enter through the skin -- in Uganda the culprit is mainly Schistosoma mansoni, which lives in the blood vessels of the intestines and lays eggs that pass out in faeces. When it rains, the eggs are swept into the lake where they hatch into young worms. The young worms enter snails, where they mature before being released back into the lake water where they seek out hosts to infect.

"The children are often infected when they accompany their mothers to the lake to collect water for domestic use," says Dr. Robert Tweyongyere, one of the lead researchers, working with Makerere University. The researchers examined expectant mothers for possible effects of Schistosoma mansoni and its treatment during pregnancy. Their results attribute the infection in the five-year-olds to their frequent access to the lake water and not the mothers' infection during pregnancy, as would be expected.

Currently, children five-years-old and younger are neglected during campaigns against bilharzia including distribution of medicines.

The fight against bilharzia, mainly through distribution of medicine (praziquantel) among affected communities, had largely ignored pregnant and breast-feeding women until 2002 when a World Health Organization team of experts recommended that treatment for bilharzia during pregnancy should be carried out. This recommendation has allowed women of childbearing age to be included in bilharzia control programmes. However, there is still limited information on the effects of bilharzia or its treatment during pregnancy on pregnant women and their offspring.

The researchers recommend that bilharzia control programs should also seriously consider including the children five-years-old and younger living in the communities at risk of bilharzia infection.

Maternal bilharzia or its treatment during pregnancy may have an influence on regulation of the body's immune responses to bilharzia worms. "This may have some effect on the progress of disease manifestations," says Dr. Robert Tweyongyere.

The study discovered that the number of children with and without bilharzia was not much different between those whose mothers were treated for bilharzia during pregnancy and those who were not.

"Provision of clean water, which may indirectly reduce mothers accessing the lake, would have a direct impact in reducing bilharzia infection in the children," says Prof. Alison Elliott of LSHTM working with UVRI. The researchers further recommend inclusion of sanitation and hygiene to help break the cycle by preventing eggs in faeces from getting to the lake by encouraging the affected communities to use latrines properly.

The researchers noted that more studies are needed to document and put to light any other outcomes that may be associated with bilharzia and its treatment during pregnancy on the offspring.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Public Library of Science. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Robert Tweyongyere, Peter Naniima, Patrice A. Mawa, Frances M. Jones, Emily L. Webb, Stephen Cose, David W. Dunne, Alison M. Elliott. Effect of Maternal Schistosoma mansoni Infection and Praziquantel Treatment During Pregnancy on Schistosoma mansoni Infection and Immune Responsiveness among Offspring at Age Five Years. PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases, 2013; 7 (10): e2501 DOI: 10.1371/journal.pntd.0002501

Cite This Page:

Public Library of Science. "Five-year-old children as likely to suffer from bilharzia as their mothers." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 17 October 2013. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/10/131017173642.htm>.
Public Library of Science. (2013, October 17). Five-year-old children as likely to suffer from bilharzia as their mothers. ScienceDaily. Retrieved October 25, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/10/131017173642.htm
Public Library of Science. "Five-year-old children as likely to suffer from bilharzia as their mothers." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/10/131017173642.htm (accessed October 25, 2014).

Share This



More Health & Medicine News

Saturday, October 25, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

IKEA Desk Converts From Standing to Sitting With One Button

IKEA Desk Converts From Standing to Sitting With One Button

Buzz60 (Oct. 24, 2014) IKEA is out with a new convertible desk that can convert from a sitting desk to a standing one with just the push of a button. Jen Markham explains. Video provided by Buzz60
Powered by NewsLook.com
Ebola Protective Suits Being Made in China

Ebola Protective Suits Being Made in China

AFP (Oct. 24, 2014) A factory in China is busy making Ebola protective suits for healthcare workers and others fighting the spread of the virus. Duration: 00:38 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
WHO: Millions of Ebola Vaccine Doses by 2015

WHO: Millions of Ebola Vaccine Doses by 2015

AP (Oct. 24, 2014) The World Health Organization said on Friday that millions of doses of two experimental Ebola vaccines could be ready for use in 2015 and five more experimental vaccines would start being tested in March. (Oct. 24) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Doctor in NYC Quarantined With Ebola

Doctor in NYC Quarantined With Ebola

AP (Oct. 24, 2014) An emergency room doctor who recently returned to the city after treating Ebola patients in West Africa has tested positive for the virus. He's quarantined in a hospital. (Oct. 24) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins