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Small changes in agricultural practices could reduce produce-borne illness

Date:
October 21, 2013
Source:
American Society for Microbiology
Summary:
Researchers have identified some agricultural management practices in the field that can either boost or reduce the risk of contamination in produce from two major foodborne pathogens: salmonella, the biggest single killer among the foodborne microbes, and Listeria monocytogenes.

Researchers from Cornell University have identified some agricultural management practices in the field that can either boost or reduce the risk of contamination in produce from two major foodborne pathogens: salmonella, the biggest single killer among the foodborne microbes, and Listeria monocytogenes. Their findings are published ahead of print in the journal Applied and Environmental Microbiology.

"This is going to help make produce safer," says Laura Strawn, a researcher on the study. "We could significantly reduce risk of contamination through changes that occur a few days before the harvest."

Many of the risk factors were influenced by when they were applied to fields which suggests that adjustments to current practices may reduce the potential for contamination with minimal cost to growers, says Strawn.

Foodborne illness sickens an estimated 9.4 million, and kills around 1,300 annually in the US, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Produce accounts for nearly half the illnesses, and 23 percent of the deaths.

"The research is the first to use field collected data to show the association between certain management practices and an increased or decreased likelihood of salmonella and L. monocytogenes," says Strawn.

For salmonella, manure application within the year prior to the researchers' sampling boosted the odds of a contaminated field, while the presence of a buffer zone between the fields and potential pathogen reservoirs such as livestock operations or waterways was protective.

Irrigation within three days before sample collection raised the risk of listeria contamination six-fold. Soil cultivation within the week before sampling also increased the chances of contamination.

"These findings will assist growers in evaluating their current on-farm food safety plans (e.g. "Good Agricultural Practices"), implementing preventive controls that reduce the risk of pre-harvest contamination, and making more informed decisions related to field practices prior to harvest," says Strawn. "Small changes in how produce is grown and managed could result in a large reduction of food safety risks."


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by American Society for Microbiology. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Strawn et al. Risk Factors Associated with Salmonella and Listeria monocytogenes Contamination of Produce Fields. Applied and Environmental Microbiology, December 2013

Cite This Page:

American Society for Microbiology. "Small changes in agricultural practices could reduce produce-borne illness." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 21 October 2013. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/10/131021155812.htm>.
American Society for Microbiology. (2013, October 21). Small changes in agricultural practices could reduce produce-borne illness. ScienceDaily. Retrieved September 18, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/10/131021155812.htm
American Society for Microbiology. "Small changes in agricultural practices could reduce produce-borne illness." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/10/131021155812.htm (accessed September 18, 2014).

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