Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

PVC as flooring material in childhood is related to asthma 10 years later

Date:
October 24, 2013
Source:
Expertsvar
Summary:
Children who had PVC floorings in the bedroom at baseline were more likely to develop asthma during the following 10 years period when compared with children living without such flooring material. Furthermore, there were indications that PVC flooring in the parents’ bedrooms were stronger associated with the new cases of asthma when compared with child's bedroom. This could be an indication that prenatal exposure is of importance.

PVC flooring. Soft polyvinyl chloride (PVC) is common flooring material. It contains phthalates that are normally released to the surrounding environment.
Credit: © Ingo Bartussek / Fotolia

Children who had PVC flooring in the bedroom at baseline were more likely to develop asthma during the following 10 years period when compared with children living without such flooring material. Furthermore, there were indications that PVC flooring in the parents' bedrooms were stronger associated with the new cases of asthma when compared with child's bedroom. This could be an indication that prenatal exposure is of importance.

Soft polyvinyl chloride (PVC) is common flooring material in Swedish homes used in more than 30% of the bedrooms. Soft PVC includes phthalates that normally are released to the surrounding environment. Phthalates is a group of chemicals with suspected endocrine disrupting properties that may impact on several chronic diseases/disorders such as asthma and allergy. The current study was aimed to investigate if PVC-flooring in the home of children in the age of 1-5 years was associated with the development of asthma in 5-year and 10-year follow-up investigations (n=3,228).

The Dampness in Buildings and Health (DBH) study started in the year of 2000 with a questionnaire to the parents of more than 14,000 children (1-5 years of age) in Värmland, Sweden, with responses from almost 11,000 children corresponding to a response rate of 79%. In this baseline questionnaire we screened for health in the family, lifestyles, building characteristics, etc. In 2005 we made a first 5 year follow up study and 2010 we made a second 10 year follow up, i.e., the data for the current study. The major interest in the follow up studies was to identify children that had developed asthma and other allergic diseases during the period after the baseline investigation.

Children who had PVC floorings in the bedroom at baseline were more likely to develop doctor diagnosed asthma during the following 10 years period when compared with children living without such flooring material. The risk was in several cases more than doubled. Furthermore, there were indications that PVC flooring in the parents' bedrooms were stronger associated with the new cases of doctor diagnosed asthma when compared with child's bedroom. This could be an indication that prenatal exposure is of importance.

This is yet another study indicating health risks related to exposure for chemicals with suspected endocrine disrupting properties (such as phthalates) or products that contain such compounds. We have earlier shown that PVC flooring material is a source for phthalates found in indoor dust, that PVC materials in the home can be related to uptake of one phthalate (butylbenzyl phthalate, BBzP) in infants aged 2-6 months, and that the concentration of phthalates in dust can be related to human uptake of the same phthalates. Further, PVC flooring material as well as indoor dust concentration of phthalates and most recently, prenatal exposure for phthalates can be associated to eczema and asthma in children.

This means that we can follow phthalates from one strong source (PVC), over to indoor dust concentrations, further to human uptake and finally there are findings showing that such exposure might be of importance for asthma and eczema in children.

Our results together with others suggest that PVC flooring and phthalate exposure in early life is a risk for later development of asthma.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Expertsvar. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Huan Shu, Bo A. Jönsson, Malin Larsson, Eewa Nånberg, Carl-Gustaf Bornehag. PVC-flooring at home and development of asthma among young children in Sweden, a 10-year follow-up. Indoor Air, 2013; DOI: 10.1111/ina.12074

Cite This Page:

Expertsvar. "PVC as flooring material in childhood is related to asthma 10 years later." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 24 October 2013. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/10/131024102044.htm>.
Expertsvar. (2013, October 24). PVC as flooring material in childhood is related to asthma 10 years later. ScienceDaily. Retrieved July 24, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/10/131024102044.htm
Expertsvar. "PVC as flooring material in childhood is related to asthma 10 years later." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/10/131024102044.htm (accessed July 24, 2014).

Share This




More Health & Medicine News

Thursday, July 24, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

New Painkiller Designed To Discourage Abuse: Will It Work?

New Painkiller Designed To Discourage Abuse: Will It Work?

Newsy (July 24, 2014) — The FDA approved Targiniq ER on Wednesday, a painkiller designed to keep users from abusing it. Like any new medication, however, it has doubters. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Doctor At Forefront Of Fighting Ebola Outbreak Gets Ebola

Doctor At Forefront Of Fighting Ebola Outbreak Gets Ebola

Newsy (July 24, 2014) — Sheik Umar Khan has treated many of the people infected in the Ebola outbreak, and now he's become one of them. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Condemned Man's US Execution Takes Nearly Two Hours

Condemned Man's US Execution Takes Nearly Two Hours

AFP (July 24, 2014) — America's death penalty debate raged Thursday after it took nearly two hours for Arizona to execute a prisoner who lost a Supreme Court battle challenging the experimental lethal drug cocktail. Duration: 00:55 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Can Watching TV Make You Feel Like A Failure?

Can Watching TV Make You Feel Like A Failure?

Newsy (July 24, 2014) — A study by German researchers claims watching TV while you're stressed out can make you feel guilty and like a failure. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
 
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:  

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

    Health News

      Environment News

        Technology News



          Save/Print:
          Share:  

          Free Subscriptions


          Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

          Get Social & Mobile


          Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

          Have Feedback?


          Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
          Mobile iPhone Android Web
          Follow Facebook Twitter Google+
          Subscribe RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
          Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins