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Walking program shows promise in reducing joint stiffness in older breast cancer survivors on aromatase inhibitor therapy

Date:
October 27, 2013
Source:
American College of Rheumatology (ACR)
Summary:
A self-directed walking program shows promise in easing joint stiffness in older women who experienced these symptoms while taking aromatase inhibitor therapy for breast cancer, according to new research.

A self-directed walking program shows promise in easing joint stiffness in older women who experienced these symptoms while taking aromatase inhibitor therapy for breast cancer, according to research presented this week at the American College of Rheumatology Annual Meeting in San Diego.

Postmenopausal women with breast cancer whose treatment generally includes an aromatase inhibitor, or AI, often experience joint pain or stiffness known as AI-associated arthralgia. An estimated 20 to 32 percent of these women stop taking their AI due to this side effect. Researchers at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill conducted a pilot study to assess the potential positive effects of physical activity on joint pain and stiffness in these patients, as a potential alternative or adjunctive approach to arthralgia management that would enable them to continue their cancer therapy while living as pain- free as possible.

"We were interested in seeing if a physical activity program that is evidence-based for reducing joint pain, stiffness and fatigue in adults with arthritis might have similar benefits for women experiencing AI- associated arthralgia," says Kirsten A. Nyrop, PhD; research associate; Thurston Arthritis Research Center, School of Medicine; University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; and lead investigator for the pilot study. "We were particularly interested in testing the feasibility and benefits of this program among older breast cancer survivors, because cancer is a disease of aging and physical activity may pose a special challenge for this age group."

The researchers tested the Arthritis Foundation's Walk With Ease self-directed walking program, which they adapted for breast cancer patients. Twenty women participated in the study. All were age 65 and older, had Stage I-III breast cancer, were on AI therapy, and reported joint pain or stiffness. The women followed the walking program for six weeks.

At the end of six weeks, 100 percent of the study participants said they would recommend the program to other breast cancer survivors experiencing joint pain or stiffness. All the participants also reported that they learned how physical activity could lessen their joint pain and stiffness, and that the program taught them how to safely engage in physical activity. In addition, 90 percent thought the program motivated them to be more physically active, explained how to overcome physical and mental barriers to exercise, and reported they were extremely confident that they would continue walking in the future. After six weeks of walking, the average joint pain scores among the participants decreased by 10 percent, fatigue decreased by 19 percent, and joint stiffness decreased by 32 percent. This led researchers to conclude that a moderate-intensity self-directed walking program is feasible for elderly breast cancer patients on AI therapy and can increase their engagement in regular walking or similarly safe physical activity.

"Physical activity is recommended for breast cancer patients -- as it is for all adults -- for both physical and mental health reasons," Dr. Nyrop explains. "It is important to offer breast cancer survivors physical activity options that are safe, enjoyable, and easy to do at home and on their own -- with the promise of joint symptom relief that will encourage them to remain physically active in the long run."


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by American College of Rheumatology (ACR). Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

American College of Rheumatology (ACR). "Walking program shows promise in reducing joint stiffness in older breast cancer survivors on aromatase inhibitor therapy." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 27 October 2013. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/10/131027123035.htm>.
American College of Rheumatology (ACR). (2013, October 27). Walking program shows promise in reducing joint stiffness in older breast cancer survivors on aromatase inhibitor therapy. ScienceDaily. Retrieved September 18, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/10/131027123035.htm
American College of Rheumatology (ACR). "Walking program shows promise in reducing joint stiffness in older breast cancer survivors on aromatase inhibitor therapy." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/10/131027123035.htm (accessed September 18, 2014).

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