Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

NASA researchers to flying insects: 'Bug off! '

Date:
November 5, 2013
Source:
NASA
Summary:
When flying insects get in the way of an airplane's wing during takeoff or landing, it's not just the bugs that suffer. Those little blasts of bug guts disrupt the laminar -- or smooth -- flow of air over the airplane's wings, creating more drag on the airplane and contributing to increased fuel consumption. That's why a group of researchers at NASA's Langley Research Center -- the "bug team" -- recently ran several flight tests of coatings that may one day reduce the amount of bug contamination on the wings of commercial aircraft.

Researchers at NASA's Langley Research Center prepare the non-stick coatings that will be put on portions of the wing of a research aircraft ready to fly in sticky buggy late summer weather over Virginia.
Credit: NASA Langley / David C. Bowman

A bee and a jumbo jet: common sense would tell you that the tiny insect couldn't possibly cause any troubles for the massive airplane, right?

Actually, no. Bees can cause trouble. So can mosquitoes. Even lowly gnats.

When flying insects get in the way of an airplane's wing during takeoff or landing, it's not just the bugs that suffer. Those little blasts of bug guts disrupt the laminar -- or smooth -- flow of air over the airplane's wings, creating more drag on the airplane and contributing to increased fuel consumption.

That's why a group of researchers at NASA's Langley Research Center -- the "bug team" -- recently ran several flight tests of coatings that may one day reduce the amount of bug contamination on the wings of commercial aircraft. Over the course of a few days, the bug team put the coatings through a series of real-deal takeoffs and landings on NASA Langley's HU-25C Falcon aircraft.

"The reason we do these tests at low altitudes or do a lot of takeoffs and landings is because bug accumulation occurs at anywhere from the ground to less than 1,000 feet," said Mia Siochi, a materials researcher at NASA Langley.

Bug accumulation not only costs the airlines more money because of increased fuel burn, but it can also lead to increased pollution as that fuel is burned. Both issues are important to a team that's doing this work as part of NASA's Environmentally Responsible Aviation (ERA) project.

For each flight test, researchers attached surfaces covered with engineered coatings and then an uncoated "control" surface to each wing of the HU-25C. In all, researchers tested eight coatings.

"We fly [test] controls and assume that if the other surfaces were not coated they would get the same density of bug strikes," Siochi said.

In other words, if the engineered coatings came back with fewer bug splats on them than the control surfaces, they're working. And Siochi and her team did, in fact, find that the coated surfaces had fewer and smaller splats.

That's right, size was important, too. One of the notable differences in the characteristics of insect residues between coated and uncoated surfaces is the smaller area of the residue. In some cases, residue heights were also reduced. The combination of lower residue height and smaller splat area can help reduce disruption in laminar flow. Smaller splats also increase the probability that the contaminants will come off during flight and keep the wing surface clean.

Even if this round of flight tests bolsters the case for the use of NASA Langley's bug coatings, it will probably be quite some time before they end up on commercial airliners. In addition to reducing the number and size of bug residues, the coatings have to be durable enough to withstand a lot of time in operation -- years even. So some of the more promising surfaces are undergoing environmental durability testing in conditions that mimic rain, humidity and ultraviolet radiation.

There's also cost to consider. Siochi says the savings in fuel have to be enough to make up for the cost of applying the coatings.

"So we have to get through that hurdle of practical application of these materials," Siochi said.

In the meantime, NASA's dealing with lots of bug guts. That may seem like a gross job to some, but Siochi's fellow researcher John Gardner doesn't mind at all. He rode along on the flight tests to keep an eye on the coatings and watch for any anomalies. Finding bugs to fly through in the hot, humid Virginia weather was easy, Gardner said -- fun, too.

"I've done other research projects," Gardner said, "and this is definitely the most fun I've had."

Read more about NASA's bug prevention research: http://www.nasa.gov/topics/aeronautics/features/bug_team.html


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by NASA. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

NASA. "NASA researchers to flying insects: 'Bug off! '." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 5 November 2013. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/11/131105122725.htm>.
NASA. (2013, November 5). NASA researchers to flying insects: 'Bug off! '. ScienceDaily. Retrieved July 22, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/11/131105122725.htm
NASA. "NASA researchers to flying insects: 'Bug off! '." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/11/131105122725.htm (accessed July 22, 2014).

Share This




More Matter & Energy News

Tuesday, July 22, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Government Approves East Coast Oil Exploration

Government Approves East Coast Oil Exploration

AP (July 18, 2014) The Obama administration approved the use of sonic cannons to discover deposits under the ocean floor by shooting sound waves 100 times louder than a jet engine through waters shared by endangered whales and turtles. (July 18) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Sunken German U-Boat Clearly Visible For First Time

Sunken German U-Boat Clearly Visible For First Time

Newsy (July 18, 2014) The wreckage of the German submarine U-166 has become clearly visible for the first time since it was discovered in 2001. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Obama: U.S. Must Have "smartest Airports, Best Power Grid"

Obama: U.S. Must Have "smartest Airports, Best Power Grid"

Reuters - US Online Video (July 17, 2014) President Barak Obama stopped by at a lunch counter in Delaware before making remarks about boosting the nation's infrastructure. Mana Rabiee reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Crude Oil Prices Bounce Back After Falling Below $100 a Barrel

Crude Oil Prices Bounce Back After Falling Below $100 a Barrel

TheStreet (July 16, 2014) Oil Futures are bouncing back after tumbling below $100 a barrel for the first time since May yesterday. Jeff Grossman is the president of BRG Brokerage and trades at the NYMEX. Grossman tells TheStreet the Middle East is always a concern for oil traders. Oil prices were pushed down in recent weeks on Libya increasing its production. Supply disruptions in Iraq fading also contributed to prices falling. News from China's economic front showing a growth for the second quarter also calmed fears on its slowdown. Jeff Grossman talks to TheStreet's Susannah Lee on this and more on the Energy Department's Energy Information Administration (EIA) report. Video provided by TheStreet
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins