Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Better understanding concussions in high school, college athletes

Date:
November 6, 2013
Source:
University of Virginia Health System
Summary:
To better measure the effects and causes of sports concussions, researchers plan to track 130 student-athletes in three sports over the next year.

To better measure the effects and causes of sports concussions, researchers from University of Virginia School of Medicine and UVA's Curry School of Education plan to track 130 student-athletes in three sports over the next year.

Related Articles


Neuroradiologist Jason Druzgal, MD, is leading the study's multidisciplinary research team, which includes neuropsychologist Donna Broshek, PhD, pediatric neurologist Howard Goodkin, MD, PhD, and kinesiologist Susan Saliba, PhD, ATC, MPT, FNATA. They will follow football, men's and women's soccer and men's and women's lacrosse student-athletes from UVA; the study will also track student-athletes in the same sports from St. Anne's-Belfield, a Charlottesville-area high school.

The goal, Broshek said: "Can we figure out some steps to keep the players safe without drastically modifying their sports?"

New Sensor Assists in Gathering Information

At the beginning of their respective seasons, participating football, soccer and lacrosse student-athletes undergo a baseline functional MRI screening and a computerized neurocognitive test.

During each practice and game during the season, the participating student-athletes wear a new adhesive patch with a sensor behind their ear made by X2 Biosystems that captures impacts to the head. The patch enables researchers to study forces on the head in sports, such as soccer, where helmets are not worn.

Following the season, the functional MRI and neurocognitive tests are repeated to measure changes to the student-athletes' brains. The research team will then take the data from the sensors and correlate it with the functional MRI scans and the neurocognitive tests in hopes of learning more about the effects of impacts to the head -- and repeated impacts to the head -- on student-athletes.

What Researchers Hope to Learn

• How to more accurately diagnose concussions. Researchers hope the study data will be a start toward developing more definitive criteria for diagnosing a concussion. "We want to develop objective tools to determine whether someone has suffered a concussion," Druzgal said.

• How do blows to the head that don't cause concussions affect the brain? Broshek hopes that using the sensors to document every impact to the head -- not just those that cause concussions -- will provide a more complete picture of what causes injuries to the brain. "There could be a marker to pull an athlete out for a neurological exam even if they don't sustain a 'big hit,'" she said.

• How do impacts to the head affect younger athletes and players in sports other than football? While NFL players have received a great deal of attention, there's less data on players in other sports as well as women. There's also less information about the effects on younger student-athletes, whose brains are still developing. "We don't know who for or when to target intervention," Goodkin said.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University of Virginia Health System. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

University of Virginia Health System. "Better understanding concussions in high school, college athletes." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 6 November 2013. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/11/131106091326.htm>.
University of Virginia Health System. (2013, November 6). Better understanding concussions in high school, college athletes. ScienceDaily. Retrieved April 18, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/11/131106091326.htm
University of Virginia Health System. "Better understanding concussions in high school, college athletes." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/11/131106091326.htm (accessed April 18, 2015).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Health & Medicine News

Saturday, April 18, 2015

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Our Love Of Puppy Dog Eyes Explained By Science

Our Love Of Puppy Dog Eyes Explained By Science

Newsy (Apr. 17, 2015) Researchers found a spike in oxytocin occurs in both humans and dogs when they gaze into each other&apos;s eyes. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Scientists Find Link Between Gestational Diabetes And Autism

Scientists Find Link Between Gestational Diabetes And Autism

Newsy (Apr. 17, 2015) Researchers who analyzed data from over 300,000 kids and their mothers say they&apos;ve found a link between gestational diabetes and autism. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Video Messages Help Reassure Dementia Patients

Video Messages Help Reassure Dementia Patients

AP (Apr. 17, 2015) Family members are prerecording messages as part of a unique pilot program at the Hebrew Home in New York. The videos are trying to help victims of Alzheimer&apos;s disease and other forms of dementia break through the morning fog of forgetfulness. (April 17) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Boy or Girl? Intersex Awareness Is on the Rise

Boy or Girl? Intersex Awareness Is on the Rise

AP (Apr. 17, 2015) At least 1 in 5,000 U.S. babies are born each year with intersex conditions _ ambiguous genitals because of genetic glitches or hormone problems. Secrecy and surgery are common. But some doctors and activists are trying to change things. (April 17) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins