Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Getting to grips with seizure prediction

Date:
November 7, 2013
Source:
Inderscience Publishers
Summary:
A device that could predict when a person with epilepsy might next have a seizure is one step closer to reality thanks to the development of software by researchers in the USA.

A device that could predict when a person with epilepsy might next have a seizure is one step closer to reality thanks to the development of software by researchers in the USA. Details are to be published in a forthcoming issue of the International Journal of Data Mining and Bioinformatics.

Related Articles


Seizure prediction is an important medical aim for the many people who suffer from epilepsy and related neurological disorders. Medication is available for controlling seizures but a way to determine in advance when an attack might occur would allow sufferers to live a normal life safe, drive vehicles and operate hazardous machinery etc, safe in the knowledge that they will know when a seizure is about to occur and they can move out of harm's way in plenty of time.

Shouyi Wang of the Department of Industrial and Manufacturing Systems Engineering, at University of Texas at Arlington, Arlington, TX, and Wanpracha Art Chaovalitwongse of the University of Washington, Seattle and Stephen Wong of the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, in New Brunswick, explain that current epileptic seizure prediction algorithms require much prior knowledge of a patient's pre-seizure electroencephalogram (EEG) patterns. This usually makes them entirely impractical as pre-seizure EEGs are rarely available in the requisite detail or number.

The team has now developed software that can learn about the patient's normal and seizure electrical activity from long-term EEG recordings after diagnosis. The learning process then allows the software to predict when another seizure may occur based on the learned patterns. Ultimately, a portable device with discrete electrodes, perhaps worn under a cap or hat would utilize this algorithm to give the patient an early warning of an imminent seizure. This would allow them to pull over safely if driving or otherwise move out of hazardous situation and into a safe environment well before the seizure begins.

"Our experimental results showed that the adaptive prediction scheme could achieve a consistent better prediction performance than a chance model and the non-updating system," the team says. "This study confirmed that the concept of using adaptive learning algorithms to improve the adaptability of seizure prediction is conceivable," the researchers add. "If a seizure-warning device is ever to become a reality, adaptive learning techniques will play an important role."


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Inderscience Publishers. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Shouyi Wang et al. A gradient-based adaptive learning framework for online seisure prediction. International Journal of Data Mining and Bioinformatics, 2014

Cite This Page:

Inderscience Publishers. "Getting to grips with seizure prediction." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 7 November 2013. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/11/131107103747.htm>.
Inderscience Publishers. (2013, November 7). Getting to grips with seizure prediction. ScienceDaily. Retrieved November 23, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/11/131107103747.htm
Inderscience Publishers. "Getting to grips with seizure prediction." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/11/131107103747.htm (accessed November 23, 2014).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Health & Medicine News

Sunday, November 23, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Ebola-Hit Sierra Leone's Late Cocoa Leaves Bitter Taste

Ebola-Hit Sierra Leone's Late Cocoa Leaves Bitter Taste

AFP (Nov. 23, 2014) The arable district of Kenema in Sierra Leone -- at the centre of the Ebola outbreak in May -- has been under quarantine for three months as the cocoa harvest comes in. Duration: 01:32 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
WFP: Ebola Risks Heightened Among Women Throughout Africa

WFP: Ebola Risks Heightened Among Women Throughout Africa

AFP (Nov. 21, 2014) Having children has always been a frightening prospect in Sierra Leone, the world's most dangerous place to give birth, but Ebola has presented an alarming new threat for expectant mothers. Duration: 00:37 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Could Your Genes Be The Reason You're Single?

Could Your Genes Be The Reason You're Single?

Newsy (Nov. 21, 2014) Researchers in Beijing discovered a gene called 5-HTA1, and carriers are reportedly 20 percent more likely to be single. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Raw: Paralyzed Marine Walks With Robotic Braces

Raw: Paralyzed Marine Walks With Robotic Braces

AP (Nov. 21, 2014) Marine Corps officials say a special operations officer left paralyzed by a sniper's bullet in Afghanistan walked using robotic leg braces in a ceremony to award him a Bronze Star. (Nov. 21) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins