Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Mission possible: Simulation-based training and experimentation on display

Date:
December 2, 2013
Source:
Office of Naval Research
Summary:
A unique system merges the virtual and real worlds to train Sailors for combat scenarios.

Lt. j.g. Bret Andrews, assigned to the guided-missile destroyer USS Paul Hamilton (DDG 60), stands officer of the deck watch in the Office of Naval Research Fleet Integrated Synthetic Training and Testing Facility (FIST2FAC) operated by the Naval Undersea Warfare Center Division Keyport, located on Ford Island, Hawaii. FIST2FAC allows Sailors to interact with artificially intelligent synthetic forces in verious settings.
Credit: U.S. Navy photo by John F. Williams/Released

A unique system that merges the virtual and real worlds to train Sailors for combat scenarios was unveiled Dec. 2 in Orlando.

The Office of Naval Research (ONR) is demonstrating the Fleet Integrated Synthetic Training/Testing Facility (FIST2FAC) Dec. 2-5 at the Interservice/Industry Training, Simulation and Education Conference, commonly referred to as I/ITSEC. Chief of Naval Research Rear Adm. Matthew L. Klunder will discuss FIST2FAC and training technologies for the future during a special panel on Dec. 3.

Detailed in a new video produced by ONR, FIST2FAC provides an affordable, adaptive way to train. It combines a hassle-free setup, software and gaming technology to help naval forces develop strategies for a variety of missions and operations.

"This is the future of training for the Navy," said Dr. Terry Allard, head of ONR's Warfighter Performance Department. "With simulation, you can explore endless possibilities without the expense and logistical challenges of putting hundreds of ships at sea and aircraft in the sky."

FIST2FAC allows Sailors to interact with artificially intelligent forces in countless settings and train for multiple missions simultaneously. The system can replicate simple and complex situations involving aircraft carriers, helicopters, lethal and nonlethal weapons, and more.

A recent scenario demonstrated at Ford Island, Hawaii, pitted a ship's crew against several fast-attack craft in waters crowded with merchant traffic. Sailors quickly determined the boats to be hostile and engaged them with machine-gun fire from the virtual ship.

"FIST2FAC allows Sailors to 'train like they fight' by presenting realistic forces in a visual, tactical and operational environment," said Glenn White, ONR's integration and transition manager for the project.

Swarming attack boats is one of several tactics Navy leaders hope to overcome through an Anti-Access/Area Denial (A2/AD) strategy to counter threats from adversaries trying to restrict the access and movement of U.S. forces.

"A2/AD is a really challenging problem," Allard said. "With simulation, we can help the experts be more innovative in defining what tactics, techniques and procedures will go into a successful A2/AD strategy."

In addition to the fast-attack craft threat, FIST2FAC has been used to simulate anti-submarine warfare and strike group operations with aircraft carriers, destroyers and helicopters. Soon, the system will address electronic, mine and anti-air warfare scenarios.

"Currently, all of this is shore-based, but the goal is to make this capability available on ships at sea," White said.

The robust training and affordability of FIST2FAC aligns with the tenets put forth in the Chief of Naval Operations' 2014-2018 Navigation Plan. It is the result of partnerships between ONR, the Naval Undersea Warfare Center Keyport Division, U.S. Pacific Fleet and the Naval Warfare Development Command.

To view an ONR-produced video detailing FIST2FAC, visit http://youtu.be/kb1lZKcmL5E


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Office of Naval Research. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Office of Naval Research. "Mission possible: Simulation-based training and experimentation on display." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 2 December 2013. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/12/131202171928.htm>.
Office of Naval Research. (2013, December 2). Mission possible: Simulation-based training and experimentation on display. ScienceDaily. Retrieved October 22, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/12/131202171928.htm
Office of Naval Research. "Mission possible: Simulation-based training and experimentation on display." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/12/131202171928.htm (accessed October 22, 2014).

Share This



More Matter & Energy News

Wednesday, October 22, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Thanks, Marty McFly! Hoverboards Could Be Coming In 2015

Thanks, Marty McFly! Hoverboards Could Be Coming In 2015

Newsy (Oct. 21, 2014) If you've ever watched "Back to the Future Part II" and wanted to get your hands on a hoverboard, well, you might soon be in luck. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Robots to Fly Planes Where Humans Can't

Robots to Fly Planes Where Humans Can't

Reuters - Innovations Video Online (Oct. 21, 2014) Researchers in South Korea are developing a robotic pilot that could potentially replace humans in the cockpit. Unlike drones and autopilot programs which are configured for specific aircraft, the robots' humanoid design will allow it to fly any type of plane with no additional sensors. Ben Gruber reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Graphene Paint Offers Rust-Free Future

Graphene Paint Offers Rust-Free Future

Reuters - Innovations Video Online (Oct. 21, 2014) British scientists have developed a prototype graphene paint that can make coatings which are resistant to liquids, gases, and chemicals. The team says the paint could have a variety of uses, from stopping ships rusting to keeping food fresher for longer. Jim Drury reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
China Airlines Swanky New Plane

China Airlines Swanky New Plane

Buzz60 (Oct. 21, 2014) China Airlines debuted their new Boeing 777, and it's more like a swanky hotel bar than an airplane. Enjoy high-tea, a coffee bar, and a full service bar with cocktails and spirits, and lie-flat in your reclining seats. Sean Dowling (@SeanDowlingTV) has the details. Video provided by Buzz60
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Space & Time

Matter & Energy

Computers & Math

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins