Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Are overweight children less able to handle advertising?

Date:
December 11, 2013
Source:
Alpen-Adria-Universität Klagenfurt | Graz | Wien
Summary:
Weight, body shape perception, self-esteem and dietary habits all contribute to how children handle food advertising. A new study suggests that overweight children, in particular, could benefit from special training, in order to increase their media skills in relation to the exposure to advertising.

Weight, body shape perception, self-esteem and dietary habits all contribute to how children handle food advertising. A new study suggests that overweight children, in particular, could benefit from special training, in order to increase their media skills in relation to the exposure to advertising.

Related Articles


"Advertising literacy," which refers to the ability to recognize, evaluate and understand advertising, is one of the most important skills in the development of children into informed and competent consumers. Several international studies have already looked closely at the development of this ability. "Over the last 40 years, the age of a child has commonly been seen as the most critical factor in this regard," the author of the study, Ralf Terlutter, explains. However, significant differences frequently persisted within one age group. Terlutter describes the specific approach: "For this study, we used the influence of body weight and body shape perception, as well as the impact of dietary habits as criteria."

There can be no question of the relevance of this study: The number of overweight or even obese children is increasing. In 2012, the WHO estimated the number at around 170 million overweight children worldwide. Most of these children consume advertising, particularly through the medium of television. Approximately 40 per cent of advertising focuses on food. Frequently, the advertised food is unhealthy, due to its high fat, salt or sugar content.

In the context of the study, Julia Spielvogel and Ralf Terlutter carried out a total of 249 interviews at three Austrian primary schools. The children were between 7 and 11 years old. The results of the study lend support to eight of the ten hypotheses contained within the research model.

"One of the central insights gained is that the self-esteem of children, which is determined -- amongst other things − by the body mass index and the body shape perception, also affects 'advertising literacy', Terlutter reveals. At the same time, a critical attitude towards food also emerged as an additional factor. Terlutter goes on to explain: "In order to prevent cognitive dissonance, children who tend to prefer unhealthy food are at risk of developing a less sceptical attitude towards the food they see advertised."

The study authors believe that these children could benefit from special or additional training, to increase their media competence in relation to the consumption of advertising. This is especially true of the important field of nutrition. Parents also have a crucial part to play: The study showed that the parents' attitude towards advertised food had a considerable impact on the children's own attitude. Of course, parents act as role models not only in relation to nutrition, but also for "advertising literacy," the development of which they can guide to a significant extent.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Alpen-Adria-Universität Klagenfurt | Graz | Wien. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Spielvogel J. & Terlutter R. Development of TV advertising literacy in children. Do physical appearance and eating habits matter? International Journal of Advertising, 2013 (32/3), 343-368.

Cite This Page:

Alpen-Adria-Universität Klagenfurt | Graz | Wien. "Are overweight children less able to handle advertising?." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 11 December 2013. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/12/131211070213.htm>.
Alpen-Adria-Universität Klagenfurt | Graz | Wien. (2013, December 11). Are overweight children less able to handle advertising?. ScienceDaily. Retrieved December 18, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/12/131211070213.htm
Alpen-Adria-Universität Klagenfurt | Graz | Wien. "Are overweight children less able to handle advertising?." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/12/131211070213.htm (accessed December 18, 2014).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Health & Medicine News

Thursday, December 18, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Kids Die While Under Protective Services

Kids Die While Under Protective Services

AP (Dec. 18, 2014) — As part of a six-month investigation of child maltreatment deaths, the AP found that hundreds of deaths from horrific abuse and neglect could have been prevented. AP's Haven Daley reports. (Dec. 18) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
UN: Up to One Million Facing Hunger in Ebola-Hit Countries

UN: Up to One Million Facing Hunger in Ebola-Hit Countries

AFP (Dec. 17, 2014) — Border closures, quarantines and crop losses in West African nations battling the Ebola virus could lead to as many as one million people going hungry, UN food agencies said on Wednesday. Duration: 00:52 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
When You Lose Weight, This Is Where The Fat Goes

When You Lose Weight, This Is Where The Fat Goes

Newsy (Dec. 17, 2014) — Can fat disappear into thin air? New research finds that during weight loss, over 80 percent of a person's fat molecules escape through the lungs. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Why Your Boss Should Let You Sleep In

Why Your Boss Should Let You Sleep In

Newsy (Dec. 17, 2014) — According to research out of the University of Pennsylvania, waking up for work is the biggest factor that causes Americans to lose sleep. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
 
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:  

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories

 

Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:  

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile iPhone Android Web
Follow Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins