Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

New device implanted for patients at risk for sudden cardiac arrest

Date:
December 12, 2013
Source:
Orlando Health
Summary:
For patients at risk for sudden cardiac arrest, a new defibrillator is like the standby ambulance and medical team they need when their hearts abruptly stop. Treatment within minutes is the critical difference between life and death. Now a Florida hospital offers the advanced technology designed for patients unable to receive a traditional defibrillator.

For patients at risk for sudden cardiac arrest, a new defibrillator is like the standby ambulance and medical team they need when their hearts abruptly stop. Treatment within minutes is the critical difference between life and death. Orlando Health Heart Institute is the first in Florida to offer the advanced technology designed for patients unable to receive a traditional defibrillator. Pavel Guguchev, MD, and Roland Filart, MD, implanted the first device in the state on December 3.

The new defibrillator, the Boston Scientific S-ICD® System, is implanted just beneath the skin, leaving the heart and blood vessels untouched. When sudden cardiac arrest is detected, the device delivers a shock to the heart to stop the abnormal heart rhythm, reset the rhythm, and restore normal blood flow through the body. The device is less invasive than traditional defibrillators that are placed deeper inside the body along with wires inserted directly inside the heart.

"The device's greatest strength is that it reaches a group of patients who would otherwise not have an option, or who face only limited possibilities," said Dr. Filart, electrophysiologist. "Many patients are unable to use a conventional defibrillator due to medical reasons. For example, vessels may be scarred from prior heart conditions and previous procedures such as multiple catheterizations. Also, if a patient has had previous cardiac rhythm device infections, he or she would be at risk for more blood-borne reinfections."

Before the new defibrillator, treatment for some may have included more invasive open heart surgery to implant a traditional defibrillator, while others may have been unable to undergo surgery and remain at risk for sudden cardiac arrest. Recent estimates show that approximately 850,000 people in the United States are at risk of sudden cardiac arrest and indicated for an implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD), but remain unprotected.

"The device detects and protects patients from the dangerous heart rhythms of sudden cardiac arrest which occurs when an abnormal heartbeat makes the heart stop abruptly and can quickly lead to death," said Dr. Filart, electrophysiologist. "After five minutes a person's chance of survival decreases by 10 percent per minute. After 15 minutes very few people survive. Treatment in a timely manner is important."

The new device also reduces risks for certain complications. Because there are now wires directly inside the heart, as with traditional defibrillators, patients are less likely to acquire infections in the heart or bloodstream. The risk for heart punctures is also reduced.

"It offers another layer of safety without sacrificing effectiveness efficacy," said Dr. Filart.

The device is also an alternative for younger patients who will likely need a defibrillator for decades to come, and for patients seeking a less invasive treatment option.

"This gives us a new and very important tool to help patients we could not help before using a traditional defibrillator," said Dr. Guguchev.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Orlando Health. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Orlando Health. "New device implanted for patients at risk for sudden cardiac arrest." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 12 December 2013. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/12/131212094930.htm>.
Orlando Health. (2013, December 12). New device implanted for patients at risk for sudden cardiac arrest. ScienceDaily. Retrieved August 27, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/12/131212094930.htm
Orlando Health. "New device implanted for patients at risk for sudden cardiac arrest." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/12/131212094930.htm (accessed August 27, 2014).

Share This




More Health & Medicine News

Wednesday, August 27, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

WHO Calls for Ban on E-Cigarette Sales to Minors

WHO Calls for Ban on E-Cigarette Sales to Minors

AFP (Aug. 26, 2014) — The World Health Organization called Tuesday on governments should ban the sale of e-cigarettes to minors, warning that they pose a "serious threat" to foetuses and young people. Duration: 01:44 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Have You Ever Been 'Sleep Drunk?' 1 in 7 Has

Have You Ever Been 'Sleep Drunk?' 1 in 7 Has

Newsy (Aug. 26, 2014) — A study published in the journal "Neurology" interviewed more than 19,000 people and found 15 percent suffer from being "sleep drunk." Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Does Medical Marijuana Reduce Painkiller Overdose Deaths?

Does Medical Marijuana Reduce Painkiller Overdose Deaths?

Newsy (Aug. 26, 2014) — A new study found fewer deaths from prescription drug overdoses in states that have legalized medical marijuana. But experts disagree on the results. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Official: British Ebola Sufferer Receiving Experimental Drug

Official: British Ebola Sufferer Receiving Experimental Drug

AFP (Aug. 26, 2014) — A British nurse infected with Ebola while working in Sierra Leone is being given the same experimental drug used on two US missionaries who have recovered for the disease, doctors in London say. Duration: 00:44 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
 
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:  

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

    Environment News

    Technology News



    Save/Print:
    Share:  

    Free Subscriptions


    Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

    Get Social & Mobile


    Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

    Have Feedback?


    Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
    Mobile iPhone Android Web
    Follow Facebook Twitter Google+
    Subscribe RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
    Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins