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Indigenous groups more vulnerable in fight against flu

Date:
January 10, 2014
Source:
University of Melbourne
Summary:
Researchers have discovered that some Indigenous groups will be more susceptible to the effects of the new strain of influenza currently found in China.

Researchers at the University of Melbourne have discovered that some Indigenous groups will be more susceptible to the effects of the new strain of influenza (H7N9) currently found in China.

Research indicated that some Indigenous people such as in Alaska and Australia displayed limited immunity response to the effects of influenza. Published in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, senior author, Associate Professor Katherine Kedzierska from the Department of Microbiology and Immunology said that some groups have a specific genetic make-up that prevents them from fighting off influenza.

"The findings suggested that there may be ethnic differences in the ability to mount an immune response to the H7N9 virus," said Associate Professor Kedzierska "Due to genetic differences in a protein complex involved in cell-mediated immune responses, people may vary in their ability to mount this kind of immune response against the H7N9 influenza virus that emerged unexpectedly in February 2013." The new influenza virus called H7N9 which originated in birds and caused an outbreak in China in March 2013, infected more than 140 people. The flu strain resulted in a very high mortality rate of 30 per cent due to severe pneumonia and acute respiratory distress syndrome.

Professor Peter Doherty, AC, Laureate Professor and a lead author of the study from the University of Melbourne said the study shed light on what had happened during the catastrophic 1918-1919 influenza pandemic during which high adult mortalities (up to 100%) were reported in some isolated Alaskan villages.

"There are some populations that are at high risk from influenza disease," Professor Doherty said.

"Similarly, as many as 10-20 per cent of Indigenous Australians died of influenza in 1919, compared to <1% mortality rate in non-Indigenous Australians. Hospitalisation and morbidity rates were also higher for Indigenous Australians, " he said.

"This was also the case during the recent 2009 H1N1 pandemic influenza, with 16 per cent of hospitalised Australians being Indigenous."

"The genetic susceptibility of Indigenous Australian and Alaskans would have resulted from isolation of indigenous populations from the viruses like influenza. The indigenous populations were not subjected to evolutionary pressures caused by the viruses over the centuries." said Associate Professor Kedzierska.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University of Melbourne. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. S. Quinones-Parra, E. Grant, L. Loh, T. H. O. Nguyen, K.-A. Campbell, S. Y. C. Tong, A. Miller, P. C. Doherty, D. Vijaykrishna, J. Rossjohn, S. Gras, K. Kedzierska. Preexisting CD8 T-cell immunity to the H7N9 influenza A virus varies across ethnicities. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 2014; DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1322229111

Cite This Page:

University of Melbourne. "Indigenous groups more vulnerable in fight against flu." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 10 January 2014. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/01/140110103718.htm>.
University of Melbourne. (2014, January 10). Indigenous groups more vulnerable in fight against flu. ScienceDaily. Retrieved July 31, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/01/140110103718.htm
University of Melbourne. "Indigenous groups more vulnerable in fight against flu." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/01/140110103718.htm (accessed July 31, 2014).

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