Science News
from research organizations

Muscle-strengthening, conditioning in women associated with reduced risk of diabetes

Date:
January 14, 2014
Source:
Public Library of Science
Summary:
Aerobic exercise is known to prevent type 2 diabetes, and muscle-strengthening alone or in combination with aerobic exercise improves diabetic control among those with diabetes. Although men who weight train have been found to have an associated reduced risk of developing diabetes, whether such an association exists for women has not been established.
Share:
       
FULL STORY

Aerobic exercise is known to prevent type 2 diabetes, and muscle-strengthening alone or in combination with aerobic exercise improves diabetic control among those with diabetes. Although men who weight train have been found to have an associated reduced risk of developing diabetes, whether such an association exists for women has not been established.

In this week's PLOS Medicine, Anders Grøntved (Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA, USA, and University of Southern Denmark, Denmark) and colleagues prospectively followed up 99,316 middle-aged and older women for 8 years from the Nurses' Health Study ([NHS] 2000-2008) and Nurses' Health Study II ([NHSII] 2001-2009) who did not have diabetes at baseline, and determined whether their weekly time spent performing resistance exercise, lower intensity muscular conditioning exercises (yoga, stretching, toning), and aerobic moderate and vigorous physical activity (MVPA) reported at baseline and in 2004/2005 was associated wit h a reduced risk of new onset of diabetes.

During the 705,869 person years of follow-up, 3,491 women developed type 2 diabetes. They found that resistance exercise and lower intensity muscular conditioning exercises were both independently associated with a reduced risk for diabetes, even after adjusting for aerobic activity and many other potential confounding factors. Women who engaged in at least 150 min/week of aerobic activity and at least 60 min/week of muscle-strengthening activities had the most substantial risk reduction compared with inactive women (pooled RR = 0.33 [95% CI 0.29-0.38]). Limitations to the study were that physical activity was self-reported by questionnaire, and the study population consisted of nurses with mostly European ancestry.

The authors state, "The findings from our study…suggest that incorporating muscle-strengthening and conditioning activities with aerobic activity according to the current recommendation for physical activity provides substantial benefit for [diabetes] prevention in women." While women who followed current recommendations for both muscle-strengthening and aerobic activity had a substantially reduced risk of diabetes, even those who engaged in muscle-strengthening and aerobic activity at levels lower than currently recommended had a reduced risk of developing diabetes.


Story Source:

The above post is reprinted from materials provided by Public Library of Science. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Anders Grøntved, An Pan, Rania A. Mekary, Meir Stampfer, Walter C. Willett, JoAnn E. Manson, Frank B. Hu. Muscle-Strengthening and Conditioning Activities and Risk of Type 2 Diabetes: A Prospective Study in Two Cohorts of US Women. PLoS Medicine, 2014; 11 (1): e1001587 DOI: 10.1371/journal.pmed.1001587

Cite This Page:

Public Library of Science. "Muscle-strengthening, conditioning in women associated with reduced risk of diabetes." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 14 January 2014. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/01/140114202907.htm>.
Public Library of Science. (2014, January 14). Muscle-strengthening, conditioning in women associated with reduced risk of diabetes. ScienceDaily. Retrieved September 3, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/01/140114202907.htm
Public Library of Science. "Muscle-strengthening, conditioning in women associated with reduced risk of diabetes." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/01/140114202907.htm (accessed September 3, 2015).

Share This Page: