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Severity of spatial neglect after stroke predicts long-term mobility recovery in community

Date:
January 27, 2014
Source:
Kessler Foundation
Summary:
Stroke rehabilitation researchers report an association between acute, severe spatial neglect post stroke and long-term recovery of mobility. This new study indicates that severity of spatial neglect during the acute inpatient rehabilitation for right brain stroke may predict functional mobility in the community after discharge.

Stroke rehabilitation researchers at Kessler Foundation report an association between acute, severe spatial neglect post stroke and long-term recovery of mobility. This new study indicates that severity of spatial neglect during the acute inpatient rehabilitation for right brain stroke may predict functional mobility in the community after discharge. The article, "Severity of spatial neglect during acute inpatient rehabilitation predicts community mobility post stroke," was epublished ahead of print in Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation on January 9, 2014.

The authors are Mooyeon Oh-Park, MD, and Peii Chen, PhD, of Kessler Foundation, Cynthia Hung, MD, of Rutgers New Jersey Medical School, and A.M. Barrett, MD, director of Stroke Rehabilitation Research at Kessler Foundation, and chief of Neurorehabilitation Program Innovation at Kessler Institute for Rehabilitation. Drs. Barrett, Chen and Oh-Park have faculty appointments at Rutgers New Jersey Medical School.

Spatial neglect is a disabling disorder of functional vision that often complicates recovery after right brain stroke," observed Dr. Oh-Park. "This study shows that there may be implications for physical, as well as cognitive, rehabilitation in patients who exhibit severe spatial neglect during acute inpatient rehabilitation." The research team looked at whether stroke survivors with more severe spatial neglect during their acute inpatient rehabilitation had poorer mobility after returning to their communities.

The study involved 31 patients with right brain stroke who demonstrated spatial neglect within 2 months post stroke. Participants were assessed with the Behavioral Inattention Test and Catherine Bergego Scale (CBS) tests of neglect recovery, and the University of Alabama at Birmingham Study of Aging Life-Space Assessment for community mobility. Results showed that community mobility, defined by the extent and frequency of traveling in home and the community, was poorest among patients who had severe spatial neglect post stroke.

"These findings suggest another reason to support early detection and intervention of spatial neglect, said Dr. Barrett. "Even when neglect improved, there was an impact on community mobility six months later. Treatment may be necessary to achieve better return of mobility later on."


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Kessler Foundation. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Mooyeon Oh-Park, Cynthia Hung, Peii Chen, A.M. Barrett. Severity of Spatial Neglect during Acute Inpatient Rehabilitation Predicts Community Mobility Post Stroke. PM&R, 2014; DOI: 10.1016/j.pmrj.2014.01.002

Cite This Page:

Kessler Foundation. "Severity of spatial neglect after stroke predicts long-term mobility recovery in community." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 27 January 2014. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/01/140127122829.htm>.
Kessler Foundation. (2014, January 27). Severity of spatial neglect after stroke predicts long-term mobility recovery in community. ScienceDaily. Retrieved September 1, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/01/140127122829.htm
Kessler Foundation. "Severity of spatial neglect after stroke predicts long-term mobility recovery in community." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/01/140127122829.htm (accessed September 1, 2014).

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