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Mammography beneficial for younger women, study finds

Date:
January 29, 2014
Source:
University Hospitals Case Medical Center
Summary:
Researchers have published new findings that mammography remains beneficial for women in their 40s. According to the study, women between ages 40 and 49 who underwent routine screening mammography were diagnosed at earlier stages with smaller tumors and were less likely to require chemotherapy.

Mammography machine. According to the study, women between ages 40 and 49 who underwent routine screening mammography were diagnosed at earlier stages with smaller tumors and were less likely to require chemotherapy.
Credit: bartekwardziak / Fotolia

Researchers from University Hospitals (UH) Case Medical Center and Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine have published new findings in the February issue of American Journal of Roentgenology that mammography remains beneficial for women in their 40s. According to the study, women between ages 40 and 49 who underwent routine screening mammography were diagnosed at earlier stages with smaller tumors and were less likely to require chemotherapy.

In recent years, there have been contradictory guidelines related to the benefit of annual mammograms for women in their 40s. The United States Preventive Services Task Force's guidelines from 2009 recommend against annual screening mammography for women in that age group while the American Cancer Society, American College of Radiology and other professional societies recommend annual exams beginning at age 40.

"Our findings clearly underscore the impact of neglecting to screen women with mammography for women in their 40s," says the study's first author Donna Plecha, MD, Director of Breast Imaging at UH Case Medical Center Seidman Cancer Center and Assistant Professor at Case Western Reserve School of Medicine. "Foregoing mammography for women in this age group leads to diagnoses of later stage breast cancers. We continue to support screening mammography in women between the ages of 40 and 49 years."

In the study titled "Neglecting to Screen Women Between 40 and 49 Years Old With Mammography: What is the Impact on Treatment Morbidity and Potential Risk Reduction?" the authors compared two groups of women between 40 and 49 years old: women undergoing screening mammography and women with a symptom needing diagnostic workup.

The researchers conducted a retrospective chart review of 230 primary breast cancers and found that patients undergoing screening mammography had significant differences with respect to treatment recommendations, stage at diagnosis and identification of high-risk lesions than symptomatic women needing diagnostic evaluation. They determined that patients in the screened group were diagnosed at earlier stages with smaller tumors and less likely to require chemotherapy and its associated morbidities. They also found that screening allows detection of high-risk lesions, which may prompt chemoprevention and lower subsequent breast cancer risk.

Breast cancer is a significant health problem and statistics indicate that one in eight women will develop the disease in her lifetime. The stage at which the cancer is discovered influences a woman's chance of survival and annual mammography after the age of 40 enables physicians to identify the smallest abnormalities. In fact, when breast cancer is detected early and confined to the breast, the five-year survival rate is 97 percent. "Annual screening mammograms starting at the age of 40 saves lives," says Dr. Plecha. "Breast cancers caught in the initial stages by mammography are more likely to be cured and are less likely to require chemotherapy or as extensive surgery."


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University Hospitals Case Medical Center. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Donna Plecha, Nelly Salem, Mallory Kremer, Ramya Pham, Catherine Downs-Holmes, Abdus Sattar, Janice Lyons. JOURNAL CLUB: Neglecting to Screen Women Between 40 and 49 Years Old With Mammography: What Is the Impact on Treatment Morbidity and Potential Risk Reduction? American Journal of Roentgenology, 2014; 202 (2): 282 DOI: 10.2214/AJR.13.11382

Cite This Page:

University Hospitals Case Medical Center. "Mammography beneficial for younger women, study finds." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 29 January 2014. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/01/140129114500.htm>.
University Hospitals Case Medical Center. (2014, January 29). Mammography beneficial for younger women, study finds. ScienceDaily. Retrieved September 16, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/01/140129114500.htm
University Hospitals Case Medical Center. "Mammography beneficial for younger women, study finds." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/01/140129114500.htm (accessed September 16, 2014).

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