Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Weather changes may be linked with stroke hospitalization, death

Date:
February 12, 2014
Source:
American Heart Association
Summary:
Stroke hospitalization and death rates may be associated with changes in environmental temperature and dew point. Large daily temperature changes and higher average dew points may be linked with higher stroke hospitalizations.

Stroke hospitalization and death rates may rise and fall with changes in environmental temperature and dew point, according to new research.
Credit: mybaitshop / Fotolia

Stroke hospitalization and death rates may rise and fall with changes in environmental temperature and dew point, according to research presented at the American Stroke Association's International Stroke Conference 2014.

"Weather is not something people would typically associate with stroke risk; however, we've found weather conditions are among the multiple factors that are associated with stroke hospitalizations," said Judith H. Lichtman, Ph.D., M.P.H., study author and an associate professor in Epidemiology at the Yale School of Public Health in New Haven, Conn.

Researchers identified a nationwide sample of 134,510 people, 18 years and older, admitted to hospitals in 2009-10 for ischemic stroke (caused by a blood clot that blocks blood flow in or leading to the brain). They then obtained temperature and dew point data during that period.

They found:

  • Larger daily temperature changes and higher average dew point (indicating higher air moisture) were associated with higher stroke hospitalization rates.
  • Lower average annual temperatures were associated with stroke hospitalizations and death.
  • With each 1F increase in average temperature, there was a 0.86 percent decrease in the odds of stroke hospitalization and a 1.1 percent decrease in the odds of dying in the hospital after stroke.
  • Increases in daily temperature fluctuation and average dew point were associated with increased odds of stroke hospitalization, but not with dying in the hospital.

"This study suggests that meteorological factors such as daily fluctuations in temperature and increased humidity may be stressors that increase stroke hospitalizations," Lichtman said. "People at risk for stroke may want to avoid being exposed to significant temperature changes and high dew point and, as always, be prepared to act quickly if they or someone they know experiences stroke signs and symptoms.

"Future research is needed to better understand the cause and effect of changes in weather conditions, as well as to explore potential mechanisms for this association."

Stroke risk factors that can be changed, treated or controlled include: high blood pressure; cigarette smoking; diabetes; carotid or other artery disease; peripheral artery disease; atrial fibrillation; other heart disease; sickle cell disease; high blood cholesterol; poor diet; physical inactivity; obesity; and excessive alcohol consumption.

Stroke signs and symptoms are facial drooping, arm weakness, speech difficulty, sudden numbness or weakness of the leg, arm or face, sudden confusion or trouble understanding, sudden trouble seeing in one or both eyes, sudden trouble walking, dizziness, loss of balance or coordination, and sudden severe headache with no known cause.

Co-authors are: Erica C. Leifheit-Limson, Ph.D., and Larry B. Goldstein, M.D.

The study was funded by the Yale School of Public Health.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by American Heart Association. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

American Heart Association. "Weather changes may be linked with stroke hospitalization, death." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 12 February 2014. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/02/140212112559.htm>.
American Heart Association. (2014, February 12). Weather changes may be linked with stroke hospitalization, death. ScienceDaily. Retrieved July 27, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/02/140212112559.htm
American Heart Association. "Weather changes may be linked with stroke hospitalization, death." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/02/140212112559.htm (accessed July 27, 2014).

Share This




More Health & Medicine News

Sunday, July 27, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Trees Could Save More Than 850 Lives Each Year

Trees Could Save More Than 850 Lives Each Year

Newsy (July 27, 2014) A national study conducted by the USDA Forest Service found that trees collectively save more than 850 lives on an annual basis. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Google's Next Frontier: The Human Body

Google's Next Frontier: The Human Body

Newsy (July 27, 2014) Google is collecting genetic and molecular information to paint a picture of the perfectly healthy human. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
What's To Blame For Worst Ebola Outbreak In History?

What's To Blame For Worst Ebola Outbreak In History?

Newsy (July 27, 2014) A U.S. doctor has tested positive for the deadly Ebola virus, as the worst-ever outbreak continues to grow. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Losing Sleep Leaves You Vulnerable To 'False Memories'

Losing Sleep Leaves You Vulnerable To 'False Memories'

Newsy (July 27, 2014) A new study shows sleep deprivation can make it harder for people to remember specific details of an event. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins