Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

The nose knows in asthma: Nasal tissue samples may advance personalized medicine for asthma

Date:
February 19, 2014
Source:
National Jewish Health
Summary:
It has become increasingly clear in recent years that asthma comes in several variations, with different causes, different pathologies and different responses to therapy. These subtypes of asthma can be identified by knowing which genes are expressed at higher and lower levels in patients' airways. That information can, in turn, help guide personalized treatment to more effectively manage asthma and inspire research to better understand, manage and possibly prevent asthma. Nasal tissue samples may make genetic profiles of asthmatic patients more a more common and valuable tool to personalize therapy and guide research.

It has become increasingly clear in recent years that asthma comes in several variations, with different causes, different pathologies and different responses to therapy. These subtypes of asthma can be identified by knowing which genes are expressed at higher and lower levels in patients' airways. That information can, in turn, help guide personalized treatment to more effectively manage asthma and inspire research to better understand, manage and possibly prevent asthma.

Related Articles


The difficulty is that tissue samples necessary for this kind of genetic profiling are currently obtained from the airways, which requires bronchoscopy, an invasive procedure involving sedation. Concerns about safety, sedation, and expense limits the use of bronchoscopy, especially among children, and thus the asthmatic tissue samples needed for genetic profiling.

Max Seibold, PhD, assistant professor of genetics at National Jewish Health, and his colleagues recently described a less invasive, less expensive and safer way to obtain genetic profiles of asthmatic patients. In the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, they recently demonstrated that genes expressed in the nasal passages can serve as accurate proxies for those expressed deeper in the airways. Tissue samples can be obtained from nasal passages with a small brush.

Dr. Seibold and his colleagues showed that gene expression in the nasal passages overlaps 90% with genes expressed in the lungs. The researchers were able to distinguish asthmatic from non-asthmatic patients based on genes expressed in the nasal passages. They were also able to distinguish allergic asthma from non-allergic asthma, and associate high levels of the IL-13 gene with asthma exacerbations.

If these findings are confirmed with additional research, genetic profiles of asthmatic patients could become more a more common and valuable tool to guide both therapy and research.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by National Jewish Health. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Alex Poole, Cydney Urbanek, Celeste Eng, Jeoffrey Schageman, Sean Jacobson, Brian P. O'Connor, Joshua M. Galanter, Christopher R. Gignoux, Lindsey A. Roth, Rajesh Kumar, Sharon Lutz, Andrew H. Liu, Tasha E. Fingerlin, Robert A. Setterquist, Esteban G. Burchard, Jose Rodriguez-Santana, Max A. Seibold. Dissecting childhood asthma with nasal transcriptomics distinguishes subphenotypes of disease. Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, 2014; DOI: 10.1016/j.jaci.2013.11.025

Cite This Page:

National Jewish Health. "The nose knows in asthma: Nasal tissue samples may advance personalized medicine for asthma." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 19 February 2014. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/02/140219095503.htm>.
National Jewish Health. (2014, February 19). The nose knows in asthma: Nasal tissue samples may advance personalized medicine for asthma. ScienceDaily. Retrieved February 26, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/02/140219095503.htm
National Jewish Health. "The nose knows in asthma: Nasal tissue samples may advance personalized medicine for asthma." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/02/140219095503.htm (accessed February 26, 2015).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Health & Medicine News

Thursday, February 26, 2015

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Sleeping Too Much Or Too Little Might Increase Stroke Risk

Sleeping Too Much Or Too Little Might Increase Stroke Risk

Newsy (Feb. 26, 2015) People who sleep more than eight hours per night are 45 percent more likely to have a stroke, according to a University of Cambridge study. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
London Show Dissects History of Forensic Science

London Show Dissects History of Forensic Science

AFP (Feb. 25, 2015) Forensic science, which has fascinated generations with its unravelling of gruesome crime mysteries, is being put under the microscope in an exhibition of real criminal investigations in London. Duration: 00:53 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Michigan Couple Celebrates Identical Triplets

Michigan Couple Celebrates Identical Triplets

AP (Feb. 25, 2015) A suburban Detroit couple who have two older children are adjusting to life after becoming parents to identical triplets _ a multiple birth a doctor calls rare. (Feb. 25) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Mayor Says District of Columbia to Go Ahead With Pot Legalization

Mayor Says District of Columbia to Go Ahead With Pot Legalization

Reuters - News Video Online (Feb. 25, 2015) Washington&apos;s mayor says the District of Columbia will move forward with marijuana legalization, despite pushback from Congress. Rough Cut (no reporter narration). Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins