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3-D model of child's heart helps surgeons save life

Date:
February 24, 2014
Source:
University of Louisville
Summary:
Experts created a 3-D model of a child's heart using images from a CT scan. The model helped doctors figure out the best approach to fix the child's multiple heart defects. The result of the Rapid Prototyping Center's work was a model heart 1.5 times the size of the child's. It was built in three pieces using a flexible filament and required about 20 machine hours -- and only about $600 -- to make, and was a "game changer" for the planning of a complex surgery, the surgeon involved said.

A model heart 1.5 times the size of the child’s was constructed with the help of 3D printing. The model was built in three pieces using a flexible filament and required about 20 machine hours – and only about $600 -- to make, Gornet said.
Credit: Image courtesy of University of Louisville

A 14-month-old boy in need of life-saving heart surgery is the beneficiary of a collaboration among University of Louisville engineers, physicians and Kosair Children's Hospital.

Roland Lian Cung Bawi of Owensboro was born with four congenital heart defects and his doctors were looking for greater insights into his condition prior to a Feb. 10 operation.

Dr. Philip Dydynski, chief of radiology at Kosair Children's Hospital, recently had toured the Rapid Prototyping Center at the University of Louisville's J.B. Speed School of Engineering and became impressed with the 3D printing capabilities available there.

He asked the center's operations manager, Tim Gornet, if a 3D model of the child's heart could be constructed using a template created by images from a CT scan to allow doctors to better plan and prepare for his surgery. No problem, Gornet said.

The result of the Rapid Prototyping Center's work was a model heart 1.5 times the size of the child's. It was built in three pieces using a flexible filament and required about 20 machine hours -- and only about $600 -- to make, Gornet said.

Once the model was built, Dr. Erle Austin III, cardiothoracic surgeon with University of Louisville Physicians, was able to develop a surgical plan and complete the heart repair with only one operation.

"I found the model to be a game changer in planning to do surgery on a complex congenital heart defect," he said.

Roland was released from Kosair Children's Hospital Feb. 14 and returned Feb. 21 for checkups with his doctors. His prognosis is good.

That's good news for Gornet, whose work at the Rapid Prototyping Center routinely benefits manufacturers and heavy industry. Helping surgeons save a life was new territory for him.

"Knowing we can make somebody's life better is exciting," he said.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University of Louisville. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

University of Louisville. "3-D model of child's heart helps surgeons save life." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 24 February 2014. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/02/140224123756.htm>.
University of Louisville. (2014, February 24). 3-D model of child's heart helps surgeons save life. ScienceDaily. Retrieved September 30, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/02/140224123756.htm
University of Louisville. "3-D model of child's heart helps surgeons save life." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/02/140224123756.htm (accessed September 30, 2014).

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