Science News
from research organizations

Glimmer of light in the search for dark matter

Date:
February 26, 2014
Source:
Universiteit Leiden
Summary:
Astrophysicists may have identified a trace of dark matter that could signify a new particle: the sterile neutrino. Another research group reported a very similar signal just a few days before.
Share:
       
FULL STORY

This Hubble Space Telescope image shows NGC 1275, the galaxy located in the center of the Perseus Galaxy Cluster. The red threadlike filaments are composed of cool gas suspended by a magnetic field.
Credit: NASA/ESA/Hubble Heritage (STScI/AURA)-ESA/Hubble Collaboration)

The Leiden astrophysicist Alexey Boyarsky and his fellow researchers may have identified a trace of dark matter that could signify a new particle: the sterile neutrino. A research group in Harvard reported a very similar signal just a few days earlier.

Sterile neutrino has mass

The two groups this week reported that they have found an indirect signal from dark matter in the spectra of galaxies and clusters of galaxies. They made this discovery independent of one another, but came to the same conclusion: a tiny spike is hidden in the X-ray spectra of the Perseus galaxy cluster, at a frequency that cannot be explained by any known atomic transition.

The Harvard group see the same spike in many other galaxy clusters, while Boyarsky also finds it in the nearby Andromeda galaxy.

The researchers put it down to the decay of a new kind of neutrino, called 'sterile' because it has no interaction with other known neutrinos. A sterile neutrino does have mass, and so could be responsible for the missing dark matter.

Minor expansion of the standard model for elementary particles

The first indications for the existence of dark matter in space were found more than eighty years ago, but there are still many questions surrounding this invisible matter. Sterile neutrinos are a highly attractive candidate for the dark matter particle, because they only call for a minor extension of the already known and extensively tested standard model for elementary particles.

Boyarsky and his colleagues have already had this extension of the standard model ready for some time, but were waiting for the first observation of the mysterious particle. Measurements at higher resolution will shed light on the matter, and there is reason to hope that the spectral line just discovered will finally eliminate the problem of the missing mass.


Story Source:

The above post is reprinted from materials provided by Universiteit Leiden. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal References:

  1. Alexey Boyarsky, Oleg Ruchayskiy, Dmytro Iakubovskyi, Jeroen Franse. An unidentified line in X-ray spectra of the Andromeda galaxy and Perseus galaxy cluster. Submitted to arXiv, 2014 [link]
  2. Esra Bulbul, Maxim Markevitch, Adam Foster, Randall K. Smith, Michael Loewenstein, Scott W. Randall. Detection of An Unidentified Emission Line in the Stacked X-ray spectrum of Galaxy Clusters. Astrophysical Journal, 2014 (submitted); [link]

Cite This Page:

Universiteit Leiden. "Glimmer of light in the search for dark matter." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 26 February 2014. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/02/140226074829.htm>.
Universiteit Leiden. (2014, February 26). Glimmer of light in the search for dark matter. ScienceDaily. Retrieved July 29, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/02/140226074829.htm
Universiteit Leiden. "Glimmer of light in the search for dark matter." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/02/140226074829.htm (accessed July 29, 2015).

Share This Page: