Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Obesity rates in 2- to 5-year-olds improve, although overall obesity rates remain unchanged, U.S. study shows

Date:
February 26, 2014
Source:
U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
Summary:
The latest U.S. obesity data show a significant decline in obesity among children aged 2 to 5 years. Obesity prevalence for this age group went from nearly 14 percent in 2003-2004 to just over 8 percent in 2011-2012 -- a decline of 43 percent. Obesity increased in women age 60 years and older, from 31.5 percent to more than 38 percent.

New childhood obesity rates are very encouraging.
Credit: Jasmin Merdan / Fotolia

The latest CDC obesity data, published in the February 26 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association, show a significant decline in obesity among children aged 2 to 5 years. Obesity prevalence for this age group went from nearly 14 percent in 2003-2004 to just over 8 percent in 2011-2012 -- a decline of 43 percent -- based on CDC's National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) data. Although the JAMA study does not specifically compare 2009-2010 with 2011-2012, NHANES data does show a decline in the 2 to 5 year old age group during that time period -- from just over 12 percent in 2009-2010 to just over 8 percent in 2011-2012.

Related Articles


"We continue to see signs that, for some children in this country, the scales are tipping. This report comes on the heels of previous CDC data that found a significant decline in obesity prevalence among low-income children aged 2 to 4 years participating in federal nutrition programs," said CDC Director Tom Frieden, M.D., M.P.H. "We've also seen signs from communities around the country with obesity prevention programs including Anchorage, Alaska, Philadelphia, New York City and King County, Washington. This confirms that at least for kids, we can turn the tide and begin to reverse the obesity epidemic."

While the precise reasons for the decline in obesity among 2 to 5 year olds are not clear, many child care centers have started to improve their nutrition and physical activity standards over the past few years. In addition, CDC data show decreases in consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages among youth in recent years. Another possible factor might be the improvement in breastfeeding rates in the United States, which is beneficial to staving off obesity in breastfed children.

"I am thrilled at the progress we've made over the last few years in obesity rates among our youngest Americans," said Michelle Obama, First Lady of the United States of America. "With the participation of kids, parents, and communities in Let's Move! these last four years, healthier habits are beginning to become the new norm."


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Cynthia L. Ogden, Margaret D. Carroll, Brian K. Kit, Katherine M. Flegal. Prevalence of Childhood and Adult Obesity in the United States, 2011-2012. JAMA, 2014; 311 (8): 806 DOI: 10.1001/jama.2014.732

Cite This Page:

U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. "Obesity rates in 2- to 5-year-olds improve, although overall obesity rates remain unchanged, U.S. study shows." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 26 February 2014. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/02/140226102130.htm>.
U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (2014, February 26). Obesity rates in 2- to 5-year-olds improve, although overall obesity rates remain unchanged, U.S. study shows. ScienceDaily. Retrieved November 24, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/02/140226102130.htm
U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. "Obesity rates in 2- to 5-year-olds improve, although overall obesity rates remain unchanged, U.S. study shows." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/02/140226102130.htm (accessed November 24, 2014).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Health & Medicine News

Monday, November 24, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Are Female Bosses More Likely To Be Depressed?

Are Female Bosses More Likely To Be Depressed?

Newsy (Nov. 24, 2014) A new study links greater authority with increased depressive symptoms among women in the workplace. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Winter Can Cause Depression — Here's How To Combat It

Winter Can Cause Depression — Here's How To Combat It

Newsy (Nov. 23, 2014) Millions of American suffer from seasonal depression every year. It can lead to adverse health effects, but there are ways to ease symptoms. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Ebola-Hit Sierra Leone's Late Cocoa Leaves Bitter Taste

Ebola-Hit Sierra Leone's Late Cocoa Leaves Bitter Taste

AFP (Nov. 23, 2014) The arable district of Kenema in Sierra Leone -- at the centre of the Ebola outbreak in May -- has been under quarantine for three months as the cocoa harvest comes in. Duration: 01:32 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Don't Fall For Flu Shot Myths

Don't Fall For Flu Shot Myths

Newsy (Nov. 23, 2014) Misconceptions abound when it comes to your annual flu shot. Medical experts say most people older than 6 months should get the shot. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

More Coverage


Obesity Prevalence Remains High in U.S.; No Significant Change in Recent Years

Feb. 25, 2014 The prevalence of obesity remains high in the U.S., with about one-third of adults and 17 percent of children and teens obese in 2011-2012, according to a national survey study. Overall, there was no ... read more

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins