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Education attenuates impact of TBI on cognition

Date:
February 28, 2014
Source:
Kessler Foundation
Summary:
Higher educational attainment (a proxy of intellectual enrichment) attenuates the negative impact of traumatic brain injury on cognitive status, new research indicates. Said one researcher of the results: "Although cognitive status was worse in the TBI group, higher education attenuated the negative effect of TBI on cognitive status, such that persons with higher education were protected against TBI-related cognitive impairment."

Kessler Foundation researchers have found that higher educational attainment (a proxy of intellectual enrichment) attenuates the negative impact of traumatic brain injury (TBI) on cognitive status. The brief report, Sumowski J, Chiaravalloti N, Krch D, Paxton J, DeLuca J. Education attenuates the negative impact of traumatic brain injury (TBI) on cognitive status, was published in the December issue of Archives of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation Volume 94, Issue 12:2562-64.

Cognitive outcomes vary post-TBI, even among individuals with comparable injuries. To examine this finding, investigators looked at whether the hypothesis of cognitive reserve helps to explain this differential cognitive impairment following TBI. Kessler Foundation investigators have previously supported the cognitive reserve hypothesis in persons with multiple sclerosis, demonstrating that lifetime intellectual enrichment protects patients from cognitive impairment, as published in Multiple Sclerosis Journal. In the current study, they sought to determine whether individuals with TBI with greater intellectual enrichment pre-injury (estimated with education), are less vulnerable to cognitive impairment.

Researchers compared 44 people with moderate to severe TBI with 36 healthy controls. Their cognitive status (processing speed, working memory, episodic memory) was evaluated with neuropsychological tasks. "Although cognitive status was worse in the TBI group," said Dr. Sumowski, senior research scientist in Neuropsychology & Neuroscience Research at Kessler Foundation, "higher education attenuated the negative effect of TBI on cognitive status, such that persons with higher education were protected against TBI-related cognitive impairment."

"These results support the hypothesis of cognitive reserve in TBI, ie, as in MS, higher intellectual enrichment benefits cognitive status," concluded Dr. Chiaravalloti, the Foundation's director of TBI Research. "This knowledge may help identify those persons with TBI who need early intervention because they are at greater risk for cognitive impairment. It may be beneficial to encourage enriching activities among those with TBI," she added. "Although causation has not been proved, intellectually enriching activities may protect against further cognitive decline."


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Kessler Foundation. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal References:

  1. J. F. Sumowski, V. M. Leavitt. Cognitive reserve in multiple sclerosis. Multiple Sclerosis Journal, 2013; 19 (9): 1122 DOI: 10.1177/1352458513498834
  2. James F. Sumowski, Nancy Chiaravalloti, Denise Krch, Jessica Paxton, John DeLuca. Education Attenuates the Negative Impact of Traumatic Brain Injury on Cognitive Status. Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, 2013; 94 (12): 2562 DOI: 10.1016/j.apmr.2013.07.023

Cite This Page:

Kessler Foundation. "Education attenuates impact of TBI on cognition." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 28 February 2014. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/02/140228121357.htm>.
Kessler Foundation. (2014, February 28). Education attenuates impact of TBI on cognition. ScienceDaily. Retrieved September 2, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/02/140228121357.htm
Kessler Foundation. "Education attenuates impact of TBI on cognition." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/02/140228121357.htm (accessed September 2, 2014).

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