Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Young skin cancer survivors at risk of other cancers later

Date:
March 10, 2014
Source:
University of Melbourne
Summary:
Young people who have been diagnosed with non-melanoma skin cancer related to sun exposure, under the age of 25, face a higher risk of developing melanoma and other cancers later in life, a study has shown. The researchers found that those who had NMSC under 25 years of age were 53 times more likely to get bone cancer, 26 times more likely to get blood cancers, 20 times more likely to get brain cancer, and 14 times more likely to get any cancer excluding those of the skin.

For those in the study who had non-melanoma skin cancer, the relative risk for developing cancers of the bladder, brain, breast, colon, liver, lung, pancreas, prostate, and stomach remained consistently elevated for the entire period of the study, and the risk for cancers of the brain, colon, and prostate increased with time.
Credit: Courtesy of Keely-Sue De Connick

Young people who have been diagnosed with non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC) related to sun exposure, under the age of 25, face a higher risk of developing melanoma and other cancers later in life, a UK study has shown.

Australian author on the paper, Professor Rodney Sinclair, Professor of Medicine at the University of Melbourne and Director of Dermatology at Epworth HealthCare said that the risk decreased significantly with increasing age, but it remains higher compared with individuals who have never had NMSC.

The risk for developing any cancer subsequent to NMSC decreases significantly with increasing age: 23 times higher risk for those under 25 years of age; 3.52 for those 25-44 years of age; 1.74 for those 45- 59 years of age; and 1.32 for those older than 60 years.

Published in Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention, a journal of the American Association for Cancer Research, NMSC is considered the most common type of skin cancer, relatively easy to treat if detected early, and rarely spreading to other organs.

"Our study shows that NMSC susceptibility is an important indicator of susceptibility to malignant tumors and that the risk is especially high among people who develop NMSC at a young age," said Professor Sinclair.

The researchers collected hospital admission and death data from the All England Record-linked Hospital between 1999 and 2011, and constructed two cohorts: a cohort of 502,490 people with a history of NMSC, and a cohort of 8,787,513 people who served as controls. They followed up with the participants electronically for five to six years, and 67,148 from the NMSC cohort and 863,441 from the control cohort subsequently developed cancers. They found that for those who had NMSC, the relative risk for developing cancers of the bladder, brain, breast, colon, liver, lung, pancreas, prostate, and stomach remained consistently elevated for the entire period of the study, and the risk for cancers of the brain, colon, and prostate increased with time.

The researchers also found that those who had NMSC under 25 years of age were 53 times more likely to get bone cancer, 26 times more likely to get blood cancers, 20 times more likely to get brain cancer, and 14 times more likely to get any cancer excluding those of the skin.

"The risk increases for a large group of seemingly unrelated cancers; however, the greatest risk relates to other cancers induced by sunlight, such as melanoma."

"Early detection of cancers through screening of asymptomatic people works best when screening can be targeted at those at greatest risk. Our study identifies people diagnosed with NMSC at a young age as being at increased risk for cancer and, therefore, as a group who could benefit from screening for internal malignancy," Professor Sinclair said.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University of Melbourne. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. E. L. H. Ong, R. Goldacre, U. Hoang, R. Sinclair, M. Goldacre. Subsequent Primary Malignancies in Patients with Nonmelanoma Skin Cancer in England: A National Record-Linkage Study. Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers & Prevention, 2014; 23 (3): 490 DOI: 10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-13-0902

Cite This Page:

University of Melbourne. "Young skin cancer survivors at risk of other cancers later." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 10 March 2014. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/03/140310111543.htm>.
University of Melbourne. (2014, March 10). Young skin cancer survivors at risk of other cancers later. ScienceDaily. Retrieved July 23, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/03/140310111543.htm
University of Melbourne. "Young skin cancer survivors at risk of other cancers later." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/03/140310111543.htm (accessed July 23, 2014).

Share This




More Health & Medicine News

Wednesday, July 23, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Idaho Boy Helps Brother With Disabilities Complete Triathlon

Idaho Boy Helps Brother With Disabilities Complete Triathlon

Newsy (July 23, 2014) An 8-year-old boy helped his younger brother, who has a rare genetic condition that's confined him to a wheelchair, finish a triathlon. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Stone Fruit Listeria Scare Causes Sweeping Recall

Stone Fruit Listeria Scare Causes Sweeping Recall

Newsy (July 22, 2014) The Wawona Packing Company has issued a voluntary recall on the stone fruit it distributes due to a possible Listeria outbreak. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Huge Schizophrenia Study Finds Dozens Of New Genetic Causes

Huge Schizophrenia Study Finds Dozens Of New Genetic Causes

Newsy (July 22, 2014) The 83 new genetic markers could open dozens of new avenues for schizophrenia treatment research. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
CDC Head Concerned About a Post-Antibiotic Era

CDC Head Concerned About a Post-Antibiotic Era

AP (July 22, 2014) Sounding alarms about the growing threat of antibiotic resistance, CDC Director Tom Frieden warned Tuesday if the global community does not confront the problem soon, the world will be living in a devastating post-antibiotic era. (July 22) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins