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Spring allergy season is imminent, despite this winter's polar vortex

Date:
March 10, 2014
Source:
Montefiore Medical Center
Summary:
This winter has been one of the coldest on record, but spring allergy season is already beginning and it’s time for sufferers to start preparing now. An estimated 50 million Americans suffer from allergies, which are commonly called hay fever. "The symptoms people experience often resemble a common cold, but, if it happens every year at this time, it's most likely allergies," warned the lead author of a new paper.

This winter has been one of the coldest on record, but spring allergy season is already beginning and it's time for sufferers to start preparing now. An estimated 50 million Americans suffer from allergies, which are commonly called hay fever. Symptoms include itchy eyes, nose and throat; sneezing; stuffy or runny nose; tearing or dark circles under the eyes.

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"Even with snow still on the ground, trees have started budding and are the first to produce pollen, creating major problems for people with allergies," said David Rosenstreich, M.D., director of the Division of Allergy and Immunology at Montefiore Medical Center. "The symptoms people experience often resemble a common cold, but, if it happens every year at this time, it's most likely allergies."

An allergy symptom is the result of the immune system overreacting. It mistakes the pollen for a foreign invader and attacks it, which leads to the release of chemicals called histamines into the blood. The histamine travels through the blood and latches onto histamine receptors on other cells, causing them to swell. This inflammation causes many familiar allergy symptoms.

People with asthma are especially affected by allergies and may have asthma attacks, which can be dangerous and even life-threatening. Asthma often is triggered by allergies; however most people with allergies do not develop asthma. Over-the-counter medications often make people experiencing allergies feel better, but if they experience difficulty breathing or the symptoms become more severe, they should seek medical attention. Antihistamine drugs work by blocking the histamine from affecting these cells. Additionally, a physician can prescribe stronger medications if needed.

"By taking medicine early, you can prevent the symptoms before they begin," Dr. Rosenstreich said. "If you start after the symptoms are in full swing, it's much harder to stop the allergic reaction than to prevent it from the beginning." In addition to medications, lifestyle changes also can help relieve symptoms. Several to consider include:

• Limiting outdoor activities during days with high pollen counts.

• Keeping windows closed (at home or in the car) to keep pollen out.

• Installing your air conditioners early, since they're ideal for filtering the outside air that comes into your home.

• Washing your hair after coming indoors.

• Refraining from mowing lawns or raking leaves because this stirs up pollen and molds.

• Avoiding hanging sheets or clothes outside to dry.

There are generally three pollen seasons that vary in different parts of the country. Early spring is typically when trees pollinate, with birch, cedar, cottonwood and pine trees causing the biggest allergic triggers. Tree pollination in the Northeast has already begun, according to Dr. Rosenstreich, and lasts through early June, but can be almost year-round in warmer climates. Grass pollen allergies typically arise in late spring, and weeds cause hay fever from the summer through the fall. Ragweed is often one of the biggest offenders in most regions, as it can grow in nearly every environment.

"There's no reason for people with allergies to suffer," Dr. Rosenstreich said. "As long as you take the proper precautions, you should be able to enjoy the outdoors and make the most of the warm weather."


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Montefiore Medical Center. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Montefiore Medical Center. "Spring allergy season is imminent, despite this winter's polar vortex." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 10 March 2014. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/03/140310143912.htm>.
Montefiore Medical Center. (2014, March 10). Spring allergy season is imminent, despite this winter's polar vortex. ScienceDaily. Retrieved December 17, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/03/140310143912.htm
Montefiore Medical Center. "Spring allergy season is imminent, despite this winter's polar vortex." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/03/140310143912.htm (accessed December 17, 2014).

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