Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Operating room computer program improves care, could save U.S. health care system millions

Date:
March 11, 2014
Source:
Hospital for Special Surgery
Summary:
OrthoSecure(TM), a novel computer-based system for operating rooms that is designed to improve the care of patients undergoing a knee or hip replacement and to minimize the number of implant parts that are erroneously opened and not used, has been launched in an American hospital for the first time. OrthoSecure(TM) could lead to increased efficiency and significant saving to the U.S. health care industry.

Hospital for Special Surgery (HSS) is the first hospital in the country to utilize a novel computer-based system for operating rooms that is designed to improve the care of patients undergoing a knee or hip replacement and to minimize the number of implant parts that are erroneously opened and not used. The system, OrthoSecure(TM) was developed by a Princeton-based technology firm in collaboration with HSS. OrthoSecure(TM) could lead to significant saving to the U.S. health care industry. In addition to the savings from increased efficiency, an article published in the January Journal of Arthroplasty demonstrates the system reduces costs by eliminating wasted knee and hip implants.

"Most implant mismatches are caught before they go into people, but the parts are expensive, so if you throw one away because you realized the error before you put it in, you have wasted thousands of dollars," said Dr. Steven Haas, M.D., M.P.H., Chief of the Knee Service at HSS, and senior author of the study.

Each joint replacement implant is composed of multiple components. A variety of factors can cause a joint replacement part to be opened and not used. These include contamination of the parts upon opening, damage to the parts by a surgical team member, and the inadvertent selection of mismatched parts. Implantation of a mismatched component is a serious event, which can lead to pain, disability and early failure of the implant. These errors often require further surgeries to correct problems.

"Medical errors have been recognized as an inexcusable source of patient complications and hospital costs," said David Mayman, M.D., orthopedic surgeon at HSS who has had experience with the system. "OrthoSecure(TM) is an elegant, easy to use electronic system that can minimize or eliminate implant errors in the operating room."

OrthoSecure(TM) was developed by Sandance Technologies (Princeton, New Jersey) and then tested and validated by, and modified and improved based on input from, surgeon investigators at HSS as well as staff from HSS Perioperative Services, Information Technology, and Operational Excellence. OrthoSecureTM involves a computer program, barcodes, and a barcode scanner. Each implant part box has two barcodes, one that identifies what part it is and another that identifies the lot and expiration date. When a clinician scans a barcode, OrthoSecure(TM), which recognizes most knee and hip replacement components now on the market, inputs the product information and displays it in a common label format on a large LCD screen. This "e . Label" includes pertinent information, such as the size, the side (left or right), and how the component is fixed to the bone. As a clinician scans all of the components of the implant (such as, for a knee implant, the tibia, femur, patella, and tibial insert), OrthoSecure(TM) determines whether the parts are compatible and, if not, displays an error message. In addition, OrthoSecure(TM) checks compatibility with a barcode that has been added to the patient consent form.

In addition to direct cost savings, the functionality of OrthoSecure lends itself to patient-centered care and greater overall efficiency. HSS has linked OrthoSecure to its inventory control and patient documentation software systems to enhance the workflow of the nursing staff and materials management; this translates to a direct reallocation of nursing time back to the patient, as well as improved inventory management. Further, the recently added web-based ordering module allows surgeons to provide implant orders electronically, thereby reducing errors in the order entry process and enabling delivery of implants directly to the operating room.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Hospital for Special Surgery. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Michael P. Ast, David J. Mayman, Edwin P. Su, Alejandro M. Gonzalez Della Valle, Michael L. Parks, Steven B. Haas. The Reduction of Implant-Related Errors and Waste in Total Knee Arthroplasty Using a Novel, Computer Based, e.Label and Compatibility System. The Journal of Arthroplasty, 2014; 29 (1): 132 DOI: 10.1016/j.arth.2013.03.013

Cite This Page:

Hospital for Special Surgery. "Operating room computer program improves care, could save U.S. health care system millions." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 11 March 2014. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/03/140311151635.htm>.
Hospital for Special Surgery. (2014, March 11). Operating room computer program improves care, could save U.S. health care system millions. ScienceDaily. Retrieved July 25, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/03/140311151635.htm
Hospital for Special Surgery. "Operating room computer program improves care, could save U.S. health care system millions." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/03/140311151635.htm (accessed July 25, 2014).

Share This




More Health & Medicine News

Friday, July 25, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Beatings and Addiction: Pakistan Drug 'clinic' Tortures Patients

Beatings and Addiction: Pakistan Drug 'clinic' Tortures Patients

AFP (July 24, 2014) A so-called drugs rehab 'clinic' is closed down in Pakistan after police find scores of ‘patients’ chained up alleging serial abuse. Duration 03:05 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Too Few Teens Receiving HPV Vaccination, CDC Says

Too Few Teens Receiving HPV Vaccination, CDC Says

Newsy (July 24, 2014) The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is blaming doctors for the low number of children being vaccinated for HPV. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
New Painkiller Designed To Discourage Abuse: Will It Work?

New Painkiller Designed To Discourage Abuse: Will It Work?

Newsy (July 24, 2014) The FDA approved Targiniq ER on Wednesday, a painkiller designed to keep users from abusing it. Like any new medication, however, it has doubters. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Doctor At Forefront Of Fighting Ebola Outbreak Gets Ebola

Doctor At Forefront Of Fighting Ebola Outbreak Gets Ebola

Newsy (July 24, 2014) Sheik Umar Khan has treated many of the people infected in the Ebola outbreak, and now he's become one of them. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins