Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Immune cells need each other to combat deadly lung-invading fungus

Date:
March 13, 2014
Source:
Rutgers Biomedical and Health Sciences
Summary:
Although long recognized as an essential defense against the lung-invading fungus Asperfillus fumigatus, Neutrophils actually require a little help from fellow immune cells, according to a study. The work suggests that although neutrophils alone may contain the fungus initially (these cells are the first on the scene), they need help from inflammatory monocytes for sustained control of infection.

Although long recognized as an essential defense against the lung-invading fungus Asperfillus fumigatus, Neutrophils actually require a little help from fellow immune cells, according to a study by Amariliz Rivera, her colleagues at Rutgers New Jersey Medical School and scientists at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center in Seattle. The study recently appeared in the journal PLOS Pathogens.

The environmental fungus Aspergillus fumigatus floats harmlessly in the air, posing no threat to healthy humans. But it's a different story for transplantation patients and others with compromised immune systems, such as patients with leukemia, where inhalation of Aspergillus spores can lead to invasive and life-threatening disease. The body's primary defense against this fungus is provided by immune cells called neutrophils, which race to the lungs and quickly engulf and kill invading spores.

But these cells don't act alone, according to Rivera's new work. In fact, their fungus-killing prowess depends on another type of immune cell called inflammatory monocytes. Without the help of these monocytes, neutrophils still ingested spores in the lungs of mice, but their ability to deliver the final death blow was impaired. Indeed, mice lacking inflammatory monocytes were just as susceptible to deadly Aspergillus infection as those lacking neutrophils. Rivera suggests that although neutrophils alone may contain the fungus initially (these cells are the first on the scene), they need help from inflammatory monocytes for sustained control of infection.

If these results hold true in humans, approaches designed to boost the function of inflammatory monocytes may help to ward off deadly infections in clinical settings.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Rutgers Biomedical and Health Sciences. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Vanessa Espinosa, Anupam Jhingran, Orchi Dutta, Shinji Kasahara, Robert Donnelly, Peicheng Du, Jeffrey Rosenfeld, Ingrid Leiner, Chiann-Chyi Chen, Yacov Ron, Tobias M. Hohl, Amariliz Rivera. Inflammatory Monocytes Orchestrate Innate Antifungal Immunity in the Lung. PLoS Pathogens, 2014; 10 (2): e1003940 DOI: 10.1371/journal.ppat.1003940

Cite This Page:

Rutgers Biomedical and Health Sciences. "Immune cells need each other to combat deadly lung-invading fungus." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 13 March 2014. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/03/140313122540.htm>.
Rutgers Biomedical and Health Sciences. (2014, March 13). Immune cells need each other to combat deadly lung-invading fungus. ScienceDaily. Retrieved September 16, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/03/140313122540.htm
Rutgers Biomedical and Health Sciences. "Immune cells need each other to combat deadly lung-invading fungus." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/03/140313122540.htm (accessed September 16, 2014).

Share This



More Health & Medicine News

Tuesday, September 16, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

EU Ministers and Experts Meet to Discuss Ebola Reponse

EU Ministers and Experts Meet to Discuss Ebola Reponse

AFP (Sep. 15, 2014) The European Commission met on Monday to coordinate aid that the EU can offer to African countries affected by the Ebola outbreak. Duration: 00:58 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Despite The Risks, Antibiotics Still Overprescribed For Kids

Despite The Risks, Antibiotics Still Overprescribed For Kids

Newsy (Sep. 15, 2014) A new study finds children are prescribed antibiotics twice as often as is necessary. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
FDA Eyes Skin Shocks Used at Mass. School

FDA Eyes Skin Shocks Used at Mass. School

AP (Sep. 15, 2014) The FDA is considering whether to ban devices used by the Judge Rotenberg Educational Center in Canton, Massachusetts, the only place in the country known to use electrical skin shocks as aversive conditioning for aggressive patients. (Sept. 15) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Respiratory Virus Spreads To Northeast, Now In 21 States

Respiratory Virus Spreads To Northeast, Now In 21 States

Newsy (Sep. 14, 2014) The respiratory virus Enterovirus D68, which targets children, has spread from the Midwest to 21 states. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins