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Trends in food supplements differ from country to country, new study finds

Date:
March 18, 2014
Source:
University of Surrey
Summary:
Trends in food supplements differ from country to country, a new study finds. Researchers analyzed data from six European countries, collecting information from 2359 adult consumers of plant food supplements in Finland, Germany, Italy, Romania, Spain and the United Kingdom.

A new study, published in the journal in PLOS ONE, shows which plant food supplements are most popular across Europe, with consumers using them to complement their diets or to maintain health.

The team of researchers from the Fundación para la Investigación Nutricional and the University of Surrey found that these products are taken in many different forms, including in tea, juice or by tablet. They analyzed data from six European countries, collecting information from 2359 adult consumers of plant food supplements in Finland, Germany, Italy, Romania, Spain and the United Kingdom.

The main findings include:

•A total of 1288 different products were reported across the six countries with the highest proportion of different plant food supplements being used in Italy and Spain. In the United Kingdom, the number of different products was approximately half that of the other countries

•In the United Kingdom, evening primrose was by far the most frequently used botanical ingredient, followed by ginseng and St. John's Wort

•22.2% of participants said that they use plant food supplements when experiencing a 'flare up or worsening of a condition'

•The most common dose forms were capsules and pills/tablets/lozenges

"The popularity of food supplements is on the rise in Europe, but currently, there is a lack of data on the use of these products. The marketing of these supplements depends on national legislation, which differs widely across European Member States," said Professor Monique Raats, co-author of the study from the University of Surrey.

"Our research will be useful in informing authorities and food businesses of the popularity of specific products in their country, so that they can make more useful judgements on legislation and marketing. It will also help to ensure that the appropriate guidance and policies can be put in place for products that are being widely used."

Alicia García-Álvarez, Researcher at the Fundación para la Investigación Nutricional, comments: "The survey was carried out using the same methodology in the six countries. We now know that in these countries a wide variety of plant food supplements are consumed. 83.7% of respondents consume only one product, and 51.5% of products usually contain a single botanical ingredient."


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University of Surrey. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Alicia Garcia-Alvarez, Bernadette Egan, Simone de Klein, Lorena Dima, Franco M. Maggi, Merja Isoniemi, Lourdes Ribas-Barba, Monique M. Raats, Eva Melanie Meissner, Mihaela Badea, Flavia Bruno, Maija Salmenhaara, Raimon Milà-Villarroel, Viktoria Knaze, Charo Hodgkins, Angela Marculescu, Liisa Uusitalo, Patrizia Restani, Lluís Serra-Majem. Usage of Plant Food Supplements across Six European Countries: Findings from the PlantLIBRA Consumer Survey. PLoS ONE, 2014; 9 (3): e92265 DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0092265

Cite This Page:

University of Surrey. "Trends in food supplements differ from country to country, new study finds." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 18 March 2014. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/03/140318140227.htm>.
University of Surrey. (2014, March 18). Trends in food supplements differ from country to country, new study finds. ScienceDaily. Retrieved July 24, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/03/140318140227.htm
University of Surrey. "Trends in food supplements differ from country to country, new study finds." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/03/140318140227.htm (accessed July 24, 2014).

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