Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Adding dexmedetomidine reduces anesthesia dose required for surgery

Date:
April 11, 2014
Source:
International Anesthesia Research Society (IARS)
Summary:
For patients undergoing surgery, adding a sedative drug called dexmedetomidine can reduce the necessary doses of other anesthetic drugs, reports a study. The results of this randomized trials show that a relatively low dose of dexmedetomidine can reduce anesthetic dose while also helping to control pain after surgery, without prolonging recovery time.

For patients undergoing surgery, adding a sedative drug called dexmedetomidine can reduce the necessary doses of other anesthetic drugs, reports a study in the April issue of Anesthesia & Analgesia, official journal of the International Anesthesia Research Society (IARS).

Using dexmedetomidine as an adjuvant (additional) agent can not only lower the anesthetic dose but also delay the time until strong pain relievers are needed after surgery, according to the new research by Dr Marc Fischler of Hτpital Foch, Suresnes, France, and colleagues.

Objective Assessment of Adjuvant Dexmedetomidine

The study included 60 patients undergoing surgery and anesthesia with two widely used intravenous anesthetic drugs: propofol and remifentanil. Patients were randomly assigned to receive the commonly used sedative drug dexmedetomidine, or an inactive placebo (saline solution).

The doses of propofol and remifentanil required for surgery were compared between groups. The anesthetics were given through an automated "closed-loop" system, which adjusted doses according to a measure of brain activity (the bispectral index) to precisely maintain a target level of anesthesia. This provided an objective measure of depth of anesthesia, minimizing variations in anesthetic dose.

The amounts of anesthetic drugs needed to induce anesthesia were significantly lower in patients receiving dexmedetomidine. The propofol induction dose was 30 percent lower and the remifentanil induction dose 25 percent lower, compared to patients receiving placebo.

The propofol dose needed to maintain the desired level of anesthesia was also about 30 percent lower in the dexmedetomidine group. The maintenance remifentanil dose was unaffected by dexmedetomidine.

Dexmedetomidine Also Helps Control Pain After Surgery

There was also evidence of an analgesic (pain-relieving) effect of dexmedetomidine. The median time to the first patient request for morphine was four hours after surgery in the dexmedetomidine group, compared to one hour in the placebo group.

There was no difference in recovery time, and no increase in the rate of delayed recovery, among patients receiving dexmedetomidine. Other adverse effects were also similar in the dexmedetomidine and placebo groups.

Dexmedetomidine is commonly used as a sedative for patients receiving mechanical ventilation in the intensive care unit. An alpha-2 adrenergic agonist, dexmedetomidine acts through a different mechanism than propofol or other anesthetics, suggesting that it might be a useful supplement for anesthesia.

Previous studies have that dexmedetomidine can reduce anesthetic and analgesic doses in patients undergoing surgery. However, the new study is the first to show an "anesthetic-sparing" effect using the bispectral index as an objective measure of anesthetic requirements.

The results of this randomized trials show that a relatively low dose of dexmedetomidine can reduce anesthetic dose while also helping to control pain after surgery, without prolonging recovery time. Dr Fischler and coauthors conclude, "Dexmedetomidine is a useful adjuvant that reduces anesthetic requirement and provides postoperative analgesia," Dr Fischler and coauthors conclude.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by International Anesthesia Research Society (IARS). Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Morgan Le Guen, Ngai Liu, Felix Tounou, Marion Augι, Olivier Tuil, Thierry Chazot, Dominique Dardelle, Pierre-Antoine Laloλ, Francis Bonnet, Daniel I. Sessler, Marc Fischler. Dexmedetomidine Reduces Propofol and Remifentanil Requirements During Bispectral Index-Guided Closed-Loop Anesthesia. Anesthesia & Analgesia, 2014; 1 DOI: 10.1213/ANE.0000000000000185

Cite This Page:

International Anesthesia Research Society (IARS). "Adding dexmedetomidine reduces anesthesia dose required for surgery." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 11 April 2014. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/04/140411153455.htm>.
International Anesthesia Research Society (IARS). (2014, April 11). Adding dexmedetomidine reduces anesthesia dose required for surgery. ScienceDaily. Retrieved September 23, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/04/140411153455.htm
International Anesthesia Research Society (IARS). "Adding dexmedetomidine reduces anesthesia dose required for surgery." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/04/140411153455.htm (accessed September 23, 2014).

Share This



More Health & Medicine News

Tuesday, September 23, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Ebola Costs Keep Mounting

Ebola Costs Keep Mounting

Reuters - Business Video Online (Sep. 23, 2014) — The WHO has warned up to 20,000 people could be infected with Ebola over the next few weeks. As Sonia Legg reports, the implications for the West African countries suffering from the disease are huge. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Liberia Pleads for Help to Fight Ebola

Liberia Pleads for Help to Fight Ebola

AP (Sep. 22, 2014) — Liberia's finance minister is urging the international community to quickly follow through on pledges of cash to battle Ebola. Bodies are piling up in the capital Monrovia as the nation awaits more help. (Sept. 22) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Ebola Doctor Says Border Controls Critical

Ebola Doctor Says Border Controls Critical

AP (Sep. 22, 2014) — A Florida doctor who helped fight the expanding Ebola outbreak in West Africa says the disease can be stopped, but only if nations quickly step up their response and make border control a priority. (Sept. 22) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Global Ebola Aid Increasing But Critics Say It's Late

Global Ebola Aid Increasing But Critics Say It's Late

Newsy (Sep. 21, 2014) — More than 100 tons of medical supplies were sent to West Africa on Saturday, but aid workers say the global response is still sluggish. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
 
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:  

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories

 

Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:  

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile iPhone Android Web
Follow Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins