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Don't wait until it's too late: Learn how to spot skin cancer

Date:
May 1, 2014
Source:
American Academy of Dermatology
Summary:
It is estimated that one in five Americans will be diagnosed with skin cancer in the course of their lifetime, and one person dies from melanoma -- the deadliest form of skin cancer -- every hour. In recognition of Melanoma/Skin Cancer Detection and Prevention Month in May and Melanoma Monday, observed on May 5, the American Academy of Dermatology is encouraging the public to learn how to SPOT Skin Cancer. The campaign aims to save lives by emphasizing the importance of early detection.

It is estimated that one in five Americans will be diagnosed with skin cancer in the course of their lifetime, and one person dies from melanoma -- the deadliest form of skin cancer -- every hour.

In recognition of Melanoma/Skin Cancer Detection and Prevention Month® in May and Melanoma Monday®, observed on May 5, the American Academy of Dermatology (Academy) is encouraging the public to learn how to SPOT Skin Cancer™. The campaign aims to save lives by emphasizing the importance of early detection.

"When caught early, skin cancer is highly treatable," said board-certified dermatologist, Brett M. Coldiron, MD, FAAD, president of the Academy. "Despite this, many people don't know how to be their own detective when it comes to skin cancer, including what to look for on their skin or when they should see a dermatologist."

To increase people's chances of spotting skin cancer early, the Academy recommends everyone learn the ABCDE rule, which outlines the warning signs of melanoma:

A -- is for Asymmetry: One half of the mole does not match the other half.

B -- is for Border irregularity: The edges are ragged, notched or blurred.

C -- is for Color that varies from one area to another.

D -- is for Diameter: While melanomas are usually greater than 6mm (the size of a pencil eraser) when diagnosed, they can be smaller.

E -- is for Evolving: A mole or skin lesion that looks different from the rest or is changing in size, shape or color.

"Although skin cancer is more common among people with light or fair skin, everyone is at risk of getting this life-threatening disease," said Dr. Coldiron. "SPOT Skin Cancer™ encourages people to invest in their health and spot skin cancer early, when it is most treatable. If you see anything on your skin that is changing, itching or bleeding, you should make an appointment to see a board-certified dermatologist."

To further learn how to spot skin cancer, visit the Academy's SPOT Skin Cancer™ website -- www.SpotSkinCancer.org -- for valuable information and resources on skin cancer prevention and detection, including:

• A How to SPOT Skin Cancer™ infographic containing tips on how to perform a skin cancer self-exam • The SPOT Skin Cancer™ Quiz to test how much you know -- or don't know -- about skin cancer • How to find a free skin cancer screening in your area: nearly 500 screenings are available nationwide in May • A How to Select a Sunscreen infographic with tips for choosing a sunscreen that reduces your risk of skin cancer and early skin aging

SPOT Skin Cancer™ is the Academy's campaign to create a world without skin cancer through public awareness, community outreach programs and services, and advocacy that promote the prevention, detection and care of skin cancer. The Academy designates the first Monday in May as Melanoma Monday® as a way to raise awareness of melanoma and encourage early detection through self-exams.

The public can help raise awareness of melanoma and other types of skin cancer by using the hashtag #SPOTskincancer when sharing Academy resources on social media and encouraging friends and family members to take advantage of the Academy's free skin cancer screenings in their area. Individuals who have been affected by skin cancer can share their personal stories on SpotSkinCancer.org and provide support and inspiration for others fighting skin cancer, as well as communicate the importance of prevention and early detection.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by American Academy of Dermatology. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

American Academy of Dermatology. "Don't wait until it's too late: Learn how to spot skin cancer." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 1 May 2014. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/05/140501111648.htm>.
American Academy of Dermatology. (2014, May 1). Don't wait until it's too late: Learn how to spot skin cancer. ScienceDaily. Retrieved September 2, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/05/140501111648.htm
American Academy of Dermatology. "Don't wait until it's too late: Learn how to spot skin cancer." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/05/140501111648.htm (accessed September 2, 2014).

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