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Technology may help with imaging brain tumors, research shows

Date:
May 14, 2014
Source:
University of Cincinnati Academic Health Center
Summary:
Possible new ways to image glioblastoma multiforme tumors -- a form of brain tumor -- using the SapC-DOPS technology have been revealed by researchers. Brain tumors are an extremely serious example of this and are not only difficult to treat -- both adult and pediatric patients have a five-year survival rate of only 30 percent -- but also have even been difficult to image, which could provide important information for deciding next steps in the treatment process.

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Brain tumors are an extremely serious example of this and are not only difficult to treat -- both adult and pediatric patients have a five-year survival rate of only 30 percent -- but also have even been difficult to image, which could provide important information for deciding next steps in the treatment process.

However, Cincinnati Cancer Center research studies published in an April online issue of the Journal of Magnetic Resonance Imaging and a May issue of the Journal of Visualized Experiments (JoVE), an online peer-reviewed scientific journal that publishes experimental methods in video format, reveal possibly new ways to image glioblastoma multiforme tumors -- a form of brain tumor -- using the SapC-DOPS technology.

A lysosomal protein saposin C (SapC), and a phospholipid, known as dioleoylphosphatidylserine (DOPS), can be combined and assembled into tiny cavities, or nanovesicles, to target and kill many forms of cancer cells.

Lysosomes are membrane-enclosed organelles that contain enzymes capable of breaking down all types of biological components; phospholipids are major components of all cell membranes and form lipid bilayers -- or cell membranes.

Xiaoyang Qi, PhD, member of the CCC, associate professor in the division of hematology oncology at the UC College of Medicine, a member of the UC Cancer and Neuroscience Institutes and the Brain Tumor Center, says his lab and collaborators have previously found that the combination of two natural cellular components, called SapC-DOPS, caused cell death in cancer cell types, including brain, lung, skin, prostate, blood and breast cancer, while sparing normal cells and tissues.

"We used this knowledge to gain assistance from our collaborators Kati LaSance, Vontz Core Imaging Lab (VCIL) director, and Patrick Winter, PhD, in the Imaging Research Center (IRC) at Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center. We used SapC-DOPS as a transport vesicle to deliver bio-fluorescence agents and gadolinium-labeled contrast agents directly to brain tumors which provided visualization using optical imaging and MRI," Qi says.

"There are two things lacking when it comes to brain tumors: getting a good picture of them and treating them effectively," says LaSance. "With this discovery, there are possibilities to improve both. With good visualization of the tumor, physicians might one day be able to better determine which form of treatment -- chemotherapy, radiation or surgery -- would be best for a patient and can image a tumor at its smallest stages with hopes of intervening much earlier."

Qi says this is preclinical research, as the studies were done using animal models that were injected with the SapC-DOPS vesicle assembled with illuminating agents, but is translational in nature and could be tested soon in human populations.

"While optical imaging is not applicable to a patient population, both MRI and PET imaging are," he says. "The bio-fluorescent molecule used in the JoVE study can be substituted for a PET molecule and fortunately, PET imaging is widely used by doctors and hospitals in current cancer patients.

"This research has the potential to make a large impact in treatment of brain tumors, and most importantly, it would not have been impossible without support and collaboration from the VCIL and the IRC."


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University of Cincinnati Academic Health Center. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal References:

  1. Patrick M. Winter, John Pearce, Zhengtao Chu, Christopher M. McPherson, Ray Takigiku, Jing-Huei Lee, Xiaoyang Qi. Imaging of brain tumors with paramagnetic vesicles targeted to phosphatidylserine. Journal of Magnetic Resonance Imaging, 2014; DOI: 10.1002/jmri.24654
  2. Zhengtao Chu, Kathleen LaSance, Victor Blanco, Chang-Hyuk Kwon, Balveen Kaur, Malinda Frederick, Sherry Thornton, Lisa Lemen, Xiaoyang Qi. In Vivo Optical Imaging of Brain Tumors and Arthritis Using Fluorescent SapC-DOPS Nanovesicles. Journal of Visualized Experiments, 2014; (87) DOI: 10.3791/51187

Cite This Page:

University of Cincinnati Academic Health Center. "Technology may help with imaging brain tumors, research shows." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 14 May 2014. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/05/140514153231.htm>.
University of Cincinnati Academic Health Center. (2014, May 14). Technology may help with imaging brain tumors, research shows. ScienceDaily. Retrieved November 26, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/05/140514153231.htm
University of Cincinnati Academic Health Center. "Technology may help with imaging brain tumors, research shows." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/05/140514153231.htm (accessed November 26, 2014).

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