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Potential way to halt pancreatic cancer spread discovered by cancer researchers

Date:
May 20, 2014
Source:
Cancer Research UK
Summary:
Switching off a key protein in pancreatic cells slows the spread of the disease to other tissues, researchers have discovered. Pancreatic cancer is difficult to treat because patients don't usually have symptoms until the disease begins to spread. As a result survival remains low, with only around 4 per cent of patients living more than five years.

Cancer Research UK scientists have shown how switching off a key protein in pancreatic cells slows the spread of the disease to other tissues, a key step which can mean patients have just weeks to live.

The study, published in this month's issue of Gastroenterology, provides some of the first insights into how elevated levels of the protein 'fascin' help cancer cells penetrate the tightly packed cells lining the abdomen.

Pancreatic cancer is difficult to treat because patients don't usually have symptoms until the disease begins to spread. As a result survival remains low, with only around 4 per cent of patients living more than five years.

Study leader Dr Laura Machesky, from Cancer Research UK's Beatson Institute in Glasgow, said: "We know fascin is overactive in many cancers, but this is the first time we've been able to show that tumours lacking this protein are less able to develop and spread. What's more, we found pancreatic cancer patients with elevated fascin levels were more prone to the cancer coming back and tended to succumb to the disease more quickly.

"It's early days, but we think that developing drugs to block fascin could potentially help halt cancer spread in patients with pancreatic cancer, and other cancers with higher levels of this protein."

The researchers studied human cancer samples and mice predisposed to get pancreatic cancer. They found that when fascin was absent, pancreatic cancer was less able to spread around the body. In mice, this delayed the onset of the disease and resulted in smaller tumours.

Eleanor Barrie, senior science information manager at Cancer Research UK, said: "This new discovery paves the way for new drugs that could potentially slow cancer spread, reducing the chances that cells left behind after surgery could go on to re-grow the cancer. Pancreatic cancer is notoriously difficult to treat -- less than four per cent of patients survive for five years or more, a situation that has seen little improvement in recent decades. We've recently announced increased funding for research that will give patients like this with hard to treat cancers the hope of a much brighter future."


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Cancer Research UK. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Ang Li, Jennifer P. Morton, YaFeng Ma, Saadia A. Karim, Yan Zhou, William J. Faller, Emma F. Woodham, Hayley T. Morris, Richard P. Stevenson, Amelie Juin, Nigel B. Jamieson, Colin J. MacKay, C. Ross Carter, Hing Y. Leung, Shigeko Yamashiro, Karen Blyth, Owen J. Sansom, Laura M. Machesky. Fascin Is Regulated by Slug, Promotes Progression of Pancreatic Cancer in Mice, and Is Associated With Patient Outcomes. Gastroenterology, 2014; 146 (5): 1386 DOI: 10.1053/j.gastro.2014.01.046

Cite This Page:

Cancer Research UK. "Potential way to halt pancreatic cancer spread discovered by cancer researchers." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 20 May 2014. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/05/140520115703.htm>.
Cancer Research UK. (2014, May 20). Potential way to halt pancreatic cancer spread discovered by cancer researchers. ScienceDaily. Retrieved September 30, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/05/140520115703.htm
Cancer Research UK. "Potential way to halt pancreatic cancer spread discovered by cancer researchers." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/05/140520115703.htm (accessed September 30, 2014).

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