Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Could Carbon Monoxide Protect Against Anesthesia-Induced Neuroapoptosis?

Date:
May 21, 2014
Source:
International Anesthesia Research Society (IARS)
Summary:
Basic science research suggests a promising, if surprising, method to protect against anesthesia-induced developmental neurotoxicity: subclinical carbon monoxide (CO) inhalation, according to a new report. Low concentrations of CO limit apoptosis after isoflurane exposure in immature mice, through a mechanism of cytochrome c peroxidase inhibition.

Basic science research suggests a promising, if surprising, method to protect against anesthesia-induced developmental neurotoxicity: subclinical carbon monoxide (CO) inhalation, according to a report and accompanying editorial published in the June 2014 issue of Anesthesia & Analgesia, the official journal of the International Anesthesia Research Society (IARS).

Related Articles


Low concentrations of CO limit apoptosis after isoflurane exposure in immature mice, through a mechanism of cytochrome c peroxidase inhibition, according to a recent paper by Drs Ying Cheng and Richard J. Levy of Children's National Medical Center, Washington, DC.

In a new editorial, Dr Vesna Jevtovic-Todorovic of University of Virginia Health System, Charlottesville, discusses the prospect of using CO -- a potentially lethal gas -- to protect the brains of infants and children during anesthesia and surgery. She writes, "The major advance provided by improved understanding of anesthetic-induced neurodegeneration is the potential to design clinically attainable methods to protect against anesthesia-induced developmental neurotoxicity."

Carbon Monoxide Reduces Brain Cell Apoptosis

Copies of the original research paper and editorial are available at this week's IARS 2014 Annual Meeting and International Science Symposium in Montreal.

In their study, Cheng and Levy found that isoflurane increased brain cell apoptosis in mouse pups, in association with increases in cytochrome c peroxidase activity and cytochrome c release. However, the increases in apoptosis as well as the cytochrome c changes were significantly reduced with concomitant exposure to "subclinical" levels of inhaled CO.

The findings may have implications for ongoing efforts to protect developing brains from possible damaging effects of anesthetic agents. In her editorial, Dr Jevtovic-Todorovic summarizes the evidence on anesthesia-induced neurotoxicity, with morphologic changes associated with later cognitive impairments. She writes, "There is urgency to improve our understanding of the mechanisms responsible for the neurotoxicity so that the most effective strategies can be introduced into clinical practice."

Funding research to improve the safety of pediatric anesthesia is the objective of the SmartTots initiative, sponsored by the IARS in partnership with the FDA. Dr Jevtovic-Todorovic is a member of the SmartTots Scientific Advisory Board.

Insights into Mechanism of Anesthesia-Induced Neurotoxicity

Based on the report by Cheng and Levy, isoflurane-induced up-regulation of cytochrome c peroxidase activity may be the first step in a cascade of events leading to neuroapoptotic degeneration. In their experiments, a 5 ppm concentration of inhaled CO led to significant reduction in markers of apoptosis -- without causing a carboxyhemoglobin levels known to be harmful in humans.

A 100 ppm concentration of CO led to an additional decrease in isoflurane-induced apoptosis, but with higher carboxyhemoglobin levels. "Nevertheless, the authors claim that both low (5 ppm) and higher (100 ppm) concentrations of CO should be considered subclinical and not harmful," Dr Jevtovic-Todorovic writes.

Dr Jevtovic-Todorovic acknowledges that the concept of using carbon monoxide as a protective agent "may seem extreme," based on the devastating effects of CO asphyxia. She also notes some important limitations of the scientific evidence so far -- particularly the lack of data on whether CO protects against isoflurane-induced cognitive impairment. She concludes, "This study addresses an important issue in developmental neurobiology and moves us a step closer to understanding the pathways responsible for anesthesia-induced neuroapoptosis."


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by International Anesthesia Research Society (IARS). Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal References:

  1. Vesna Jevtovic-Todorovic. Good Gas, Bad Gas. Anesthesia & Analgesia, 2014; 118 (6): 1160 DOI: 10.1213/ANE.0000000000000235
  2. Ying Cheng, Richard J. Levy. Subclinical Carbon Monoxide Limits Apoptosis in the Developing Brain After Isoflurane Exposure. Anesthesia & Analgesia, 2014; 118 (6): 1284 DOI: 10.1213/ANE.0000000000000030

Cite This Page:

International Anesthesia Research Society (IARS). "Could Carbon Monoxide Protect Against Anesthesia-Induced Neuroapoptosis?." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 21 May 2014. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/05/140521101837.htm>.
International Anesthesia Research Society (IARS). (2014, May 21). Could Carbon Monoxide Protect Against Anesthesia-Induced Neuroapoptosis?. ScienceDaily. Retrieved December 21, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/05/140521101837.htm
International Anesthesia Research Society (IARS). "Could Carbon Monoxide Protect Against Anesthesia-Induced Neuroapoptosis?." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/05/140521101837.htm (accessed December 21, 2014).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Health & Medicine News

Sunday, December 21, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

The Best Tips to Curb Holiday Carbs

The Best Tips to Curb Holiday Carbs

Buzz60 (Dec. 19, 2014) It's hard to resist those delicious but fattening carbs we all crave during the winter months, but there are some ways to stay satisfied without consuming the extra calories. Vanessa Freeman (@VanessaFreeTV) has the details. Video provided by Buzz60
Powered by NewsLook.com
Sierra Leone Bikers Spread the Message to Fight Ebola

Sierra Leone Bikers Spread the Message to Fight Ebola

AFP (Dec. 19, 2014) More than 100 motorcyclists hit the road to spread awareness messages about Ebola. Nearly 7,000 people have now died from the virus, almost all of them in west Africa, according to the World Health Organization. Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Researchers Test Colombian Village With High Alzheimer's Rates

Researchers Test Colombian Village With High Alzheimer's Rates

AFP (Dec. 19, 2014) In Yarumal, a village in N. Colombia, Alzheimer's has ravaged a disproportionately large number of families. A genetic "curse" that may pave the way for research on how to treat the disease that claims a new victim every four seconds. Duration: 02:42 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
The Best Protein-Filled Foods to Energize You for the New Year

The Best Protein-Filled Foods to Energize You for the New Year

Buzz60 (Dec. 19, 2014) The new year is coming and nothing will energize you more for 2015 than protein-filled foods. Fitness and nutrition expert John Basedow (@JohnBasedow) gives his favorite high protein foods that will help you build muscle, lose fat and have endless energy. Video provided by Buzz60
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins