Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Escalating care in cormorbid elderly: Where do we stop?

Date:
May 31, 2014
Source:
ESA (European Society of Anaesthesiology)
Summary:
A patient's age should not in itself be considered an ethically relevant criterion for deciding 'where to stop' providing care, an ethical expert says. He says: "If societies do wish to pursue such 'ageist' policies then they should do so only do so after widespread consultation and the enactment of democratically established laws according to which patients condemned to be denied life-prolonging therapies on grounds of age alone should have a legal right of appeal."

An Emeritus Professor of medical ethics at Imperial College London will deliver a presentation at this year's Euroanaesthesia meeting titled 'Escalating care for the comorbid elderly-where do we stop?." Raanan Gillon, who is President of the UK's Institute of Medical Ethics, will argue that a patient's age should not in itself be considered an ethically relevant criterion for deciding 'where to stop'.

Acknowledging that there is a morally plausible counter-argument -- known in the UK as 'the fair innings argument'- according to which scarce life prolonging resources should be preferentially deployed to younger patients, Professor Gillon will argue against it. He says: "If societies do wish to pursue such 'ageist' policies then they should do so only do so after widespread consultation and the enactment of democratically established laws according to which patients condemned to be denied life-prolonging therapies on grounds of age alone should have a legal right of appeal!"

The moral criteria that are relevant can be summarized, he argues, as the likelihood of achieving a beneficial outcome for the patient, at the cost of a minimised and acceptable risk of harm, in the light of the patient's own views and values where these are ascertainable, and also in the context of fair consideration of competing claims on available resources.

"However, co-morbidity and age may in some circumstances justifiably have a bearing on these criteria," concludes Professor Gillon. "For example co-morbidity may adversely and substantially influence the probability of a beneficial outcome; and some old people may be less inclined than when they were younger to accept the risks and discomforts of major surgery even if it might prolong their lives."


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by ESA (European Society of Anaesthesiology). Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

ESA (European Society of Anaesthesiology). "Escalating care in cormorbid elderly: Where do we stop?." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 31 May 2014. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/05/140531213546.htm>.
ESA (European Society of Anaesthesiology). (2014, May 31). Escalating care in cormorbid elderly: Where do we stop?. ScienceDaily. Retrieved September 21, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/05/140531213546.htm
ESA (European Society of Anaesthesiology). "Escalating care in cormorbid elderly: Where do we stop?." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/05/140531213546.htm (accessed September 21, 2014).

Share This



More Health & Medicine News

Sunday, September 21, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Sierra Leone's Nationwide Ebola Curfew Underway

Sierra Leone's Nationwide Ebola Curfew Underway

Newsy (Sep. 20, 2014) Sierra Leone is locked down as aid workers and volunteers look for new cases of Ebola. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Changes Found In Brain After One Dose Of Antidepressants

Changes Found In Brain After One Dose Of Antidepressants

Newsy (Sep. 19, 2014) A study suggest antidepressants can kick in much sooner than previously thought. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Could Grief Affect The Immune Systems Of Senior Citizens?

Could Grief Affect The Immune Systems Of Senior Citizens?

Newsy (Sep. 19, 2014) The study found elderly people are much more likely to become susceptible to infection than younger adults going though a similar situation. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Jury Delivers Verdict in Salmonella Trial

Jury Delivers Verdict in Salmonella Trial

AP (Sep. 19, 2014) A federal jury has convicted three people in connection with an outbreak of salmonella poisoning five years ago that sickened hundreds of people and was linked to a number of deaths. (Sept. 19) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins