Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Which look bigger, packages of complicated shape or packages of simple shape?

Date:
June 2, 2014
Source:
Inderscience Publishers
Summary:
Which look bigger, packages of complicated shape or packages of simple shape? Some prior research shows that complex packages appear larger than simple packages of equal volume, while other research has shown the opposite -- that simple packages look bigger than the more complex. Researchers believe they have resolved this dilemma.

Which look bigger, packages of complicated shape or packages of simple shape? Some prior research shows that complex packages appear larger than simple packages of equal volume, while other research has shown the opposite -- that simple packages look bigger than the more complex. US researchers, writing in the International Journal of Management Practice believe they have resolved this dilemma.

Related Articles


Lawrence Garber of Elon University in North Carolina and Eva Hyatt and άnal Boya of Appalachian State University report that human beings are just not very good at estimating the size of objects, meaning that it is often size appearance and not actual size that affects things like consumer choice. And it is aspects such as package shape and the number of packages viewed all at once that contribute to this error. The team asked volunteers to estimate the relative volumes of sets of packages whose shapes are simple or complex, presented in groups of between two and sixteen packages.

The results of this experiment demonstrate that presentation context affects a person's impression of size much more than was previously thought. "When packages are displayed in sets of nine or more, packages of simple shape appear larger than packages of complex shape," the team reports. "But, when packages are presented in sets of eight or fewer, complex packages appear larger than simple packages."

Garber and colleagues suggest that this reversal of perception means that how we estimate the volume of a given package is affected markedly by whether or not other packages are in the same "visual tableau." Moreover, the way we estimate volume of packages is flipped when the complexity of such a tableau leads to cognitive overload.

"One implication of this finding is that a package that appears smaller than another when the two are viewed sitting on a crowded store shelf, may actually appear bigger when the two are picked up and held in a consumer's hands," Garber says.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Inderscience Publishers. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Garber Jr., L.L., Hyatt, E.M. and Boya, ά.Φ. The perceived size of packages of complex vs. simple shape depends upon the number of packages presented. Int. J. Management Practice, Vol. 7, No. 2, pp.144-159

Cite This Page:

Inderscience Publishers. "Which look bigger, packages of complicated shape or packages of simple shape?." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 2 June 2014. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/06/140602155901.htm>.
Inderscience Publishers. (2014, June 2). Which look bigger, packages of complicated shape or packages of simple shape?. ScienceDaily. Retrieved March 6, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/06/140602155901.htm
Inderscience Publishers. "Which look bigger, packages of complicated shape or packages of simple shape?." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/06/140602155901.htm (accessed March 6, 2015).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Mind & Brain News

Friday, March 6, 2015

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Suicide Rates Up For Young Women In U.S.

Suicide Rates Up For Young Women In U.S.

Newsy (Mar. 6, 2015) — According to a report from the CDC, suicide rates among young women increased from 1994 to 2012 while rates among young men have decreased. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Former NFL Players Donate Brains to Science

Former NFL Players Donate Brains to Science

Reuters - US Online Video (Mar. 3, 2015) — Super Bowl champions Sidney Rice and Steve Weatherford donate their brains, post-mortem, to scientific research into repetitive brain trauma. Jillian Kitchener reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Alzheimer's Protein Plaque Found In 20-Year-Olds

Alzheimer's Protein Plaque Found In 20-Year-Olds

Newsy (Mar. 3, 2015) — Researchers found an abnormal protein associated with Alzheimer&apos;s disease in the brains of 20-year-olds. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
This Nasal Treatment Could Help Ease Migraine Pain

This Nasal Treatment Could Help Ease Migraine Pain

Newsy (Mar. 2, 2015) — Researchers gave lidocaine to 112 patients, and about 88 percent of the subjects said they needed less migraine-relief medicine the next day. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
 
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:  

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories

 

Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:  

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile iPhone Android Web
Follow Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins