Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Women, health-care providers differ on what matters most about contraception

Date:
June 9, 2014
Source:
The Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth
Summary:
When women are choosing a contraceptive, health care providers should be aware that the things they want to discuss may differ from what women want to hear, according to a survey. Most of the information women receive about contraceptives focuses heavily on the effectiveness in preventing pregnancy, but this information was ranked fifth in importance by women, according to the study.

When women are choosing a contraceptive, health care providers should be aware that the things they want to discuss may differ from what women want to hear, according to a survey published in the recent issue of the journal Contraception.

Related Articles


Most of the information women receive about contraceptives focuses heavily on the effectiveness in preventing pregnancy, but this information was ranked fifth in importance by women, according to the study conducted by researchers at Dartmouth College.

The researchers conducted an online survey of 417 women, aged 15-45, and 188 multidisciplinary contraceptive care providers in the United States. Both groups were asked what matters most when deciding on a contraceptive method, rating the importance of 34 questions.

The researchers found several differences. Women's number one question was about the safety of the contraceptive method, whereas for providers, it related to how the method is used.

Information about side effects was also more important to women than providers -- this was in the top three questions for 26 percent of women versus 16 percent of providers, the Dartmouth researchers said.

This first study to simultaneously explore the priorities of women and health care providers highlighted the importance of efforts to elicit each woman's preferences and values as part of a shared decision-making process.

"Everything we hear suggests that women are struggling to choose the contraceptive method that best fits their unique needs and preferences," said lead author of the study, Kyla Donnelly of The Dartmouth Institute for Health Policy & Clinical Practice. "Our findings suggest that this mismatch between what women want to know and what providers want to discuss may be a key factor."

Latest data suggest that in the United States, 51 percent of all pregnancies are unintended. There are more than 20 different methods of contraception available to women that vary substantially in their method of use, effectiveness, side effects and other features.

As a result of the Affordable Care Act, more women now than ever have access to a full range of contraceptive methods and counseling, free of out-of-pocket costs. The ACA also promotes shared decision-making and the use of decision support tools in health care.

In order for women and their health care providers to have better conversations about contraception, researchers at Dartmouth are developing brief tools, called Option Grids™ These tools are designed to help women and providers work together to compare available contraceptive methods on the things that matter most. The researchers conducted the survey in an effort to inform the content of the tools.

"Supporting women to choose the contraceptive method that fits their preferences and lifestyle is a critical part of providing patient-centered care and preventing unintended pregnancy," said co-author, Dr. Rachel Thompson from The Dartmouth Center for Health Care Delivery Science. "Given the current unprecedented access to contraception in the U.S., facilitating shared contraceptive decision-making in the clinical encounter is critical."


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by The Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Kyla Z. Donnelly, Tina C. Foster, Rachel Thompson. What matters most? The content and concordance of patients' and providers' information priorities for contraceptive decision making. Contraception, 2014; DOI: 10.1016/j.contraception.2014.04.012

Cite This Page:

The Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth. "Women, health-care providers differ on what matters most about contraception." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 9 June 2014. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/06/140609205737.htm>.
The Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth. (2014, June 9). Women, health-care providers differ on what matters most about contraception. ScienceDaily. Retrieved November 26, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/06/140609205737.htm
The Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth. "Women, health-care providers differ on what matters most about contraception." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/06/140609205737.htm (accessed November 26, 2014).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Health & Medicine News

Wednesday, November 26, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Pet Dogs to Be Used in Anti-Ageing Trial

Pet Dogs to Be Used in Anti-Ageing Trial

Reuters - Innovations Video Online (Nov. 26, 2014) Researchers in the United States are preparing to discover whether a drug commonly used in human organ transplants can extend the lifespan and health quality of pet dogs. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
From Popcorn To Vending Snacks: FDA Ups Calorie Count Rules

From Popcorn To Vending Snacks: FDA Ups Calorie Count Rules

Newsy (Nov. 25, 2014) The US FDA is announcing new calorie rules on Tuesday that will require everywhere from theaters to vending machines to include calorie counts. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Daily Serving Of Yogurt Could Reduce Risk Of Type 2 Diabetes

Daily Serving Of Yogurt Could Reduce Risk Of Type 2 Diabetes

Newsy (Nov. 25, 2014) Need another reason to eat yogurt every day? Researchers now say it could reduce a person's risk of developing type 2 diabetes. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Madagascar Working to Contain Plague Outbreak

Madagascar Working to Contain Plague Outbreak

AFP (Nov. 24, 2014) Madagascar said Monday it is trying to contain an outbreak of plague -- similar to the Black Death that swept Medieval Europe -- that has killed 40 people and is spreading to the capital Antananarivo. Duration: 00:42 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins