Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Long-term follow-up after bariatric surgery shows greater rate of diabetes remission

Date:
June 10, 2014
Source:
American Medical Association
Summary:
In a study that included long-term follow-up of obese patients with type 2 diabetes, bariatric surgery was associated with more frequent diabetes remission and fewer complications than patients who received usual care, according to a study in the June 11 issue of JAMA, a diabetes theme issue.

In a study that included long-term follow-up of obese patients with type 2 diabetes, bariatric surgery was associated with more frequent diabetes remission and fewer complications than patients who received usual care, according to a study in the June 11 issue of JAMA, a diabetes theme issue.

Related Articles


Obesity and diabetes have reached epidemic proportions and constitute major health and economic burdens. Worldwide, 347 million adults are estimated to live with diabetes and half of them are undiagnosed. Studies show that type 2 diabetes is preventable. The incidence of diabetes can be reduced by as much as 50 percent by lifestyle and pharmacological interventions, according to background information in the article. Short-term studies show that bariatric surgery results in remission of diabetes. The long-term outcomes for bariatric surgery and diabetes remission and diabetes-related complications have not been known.

Lars Sjostrom, M.D., Ph.D., of the University of Gothenburg, Sweden, and colleagues performed a follow-up of the Swedish Obese Subjects (SOS) study, conducted at 25 surgical departments and 480 primary health care centers in Sweden. Of patients recruited between September 1987 and January 2001, 260 of 2,037 control patients and 343 of 2,010 bariatric surgery patients had type 2 diabetes at baseline. For the current analysis, the presence of diabetes was determined at SOS health examinations and information on diabetes complications was obtained from national health registers. For diabetes complications, the median follow-up time was 17.6 years in the control group, and 18.1 years in the surgery group.

The proportion of patients in remission (defined as blood glucose <110 mg/dL and no diabetes medication) after 2 years was 72.3 percent in the surgery group and 16.4 percent in the control group. At 15 years, the diabetes remission rates decreased to 30.4 percent for bariatric surgery patients and 6.5 percent for control patients. All types of bariatric surgery (adjustable or nonadjustable banding, vertical banded gastroplasty, or gastric bypass) were associated with higher remission rates compared with usual care.

In addition, bariatric surgery was associated with a decreased incidence of microvascular and macrovascular complications.

"In this very long-term follow-up observational study of obese patients with type 2 diabetes, bariatric surgery was associated with more frequent diabetes remission and fewer complications than usual care. These findings require confirmation in randomized trials," the authors conclude.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by American Medical Association. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Lars Sjöström, Markku Peltonen, Peter Jacobson, Sofie Ahlin, Johanna Andersson-Assarsson, Åsa Anveden, Claude Bouchard, Björn Carlsson, Kristjan Karason, Hans Lönroth, Ingmar Näslund, Elisabeth Sjöström, Magdalena Taube, Hans Wedel, Per-Arne Svensson, Kajsa Sjöholm, Lena M. S. Carlsson. Association of Bariatric Surgery With Long-term Remission of Type 2 Diabetes and With Microvascular and Macrovascular Complications. JAMA, 2014; 311 (22): 2297 DOI: 10.1001/jama.2014.5988

Cite This Page:

American Medical Association. "Long-term follow-up after bariatric surgery shows greater rate of diabetes remission." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 10 June 2014. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/06/140610205057.htm>.
American Medical Association. (2014, June 10). Long-term follow-up after bariatric surgery shows greater rate of diabetes remission. ScienceDaily. Retrieved November 28, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/06/140610205057.htm
American Medical Association. "Long-term follow-up after bariatric surgery shows greater rate of diabetes remission." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/06/140610205057.htm (accessed November 28, 2014).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Health & Medicine News

Friday, November 28, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Ebola Leaves Orphans Alone in Sierra Leone

Ebola Leaves Orphans Alone in Sierra Leone

AFP (Nov. 27, 2014) — The Ebola epidemic sweeping Sierra Leone is having a profound effect on the country's children, many of whom have been left without any family members to support them. Duration: 01:02 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Experimental Ebola Vaccine Shows Promise In Human Trial

Experimental Ebola Vaccine Shows Promise In Human Trial

Newsy (Nov. 27, 2014) — A recent test of a prototype Ebola vaccine generated an immune response to the disease in subjects. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Pet Dogs to Be Used in Anti-Ageing Trial

Pet Dogs to Be Used in Anti-Ageing Trial

Reuters - Innovations Video Online (Nov. 26, 2014) — Researchers in the United States are preparing to discover whether a drug commonly used in human organ transplants can extend the lifespan and health quality of pet dogs. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Today's Prostheses Are More Capable Than Ever

Today's Prostheses Are More Capable Than Ever

Newsy (Nov. 26, 2014) — Advances in prosthetics are making replacement body parts stronger and more lifelike than they’ve ever been. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
 
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:  

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories

 

Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:  

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile iPhone Android Web
Follow Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins