Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Hydrolyzed formula does not reduce diabetes-associated autoantibodies in at-risk infants

Date:
June 10, 2014
Source:
American Medical Association
Summary:
Among infants at risk for type 1 diabetes, the use of a hydrolyzed formula (one that does not contain intact proteins) compared with a conventional formula did not reduce the incidence of diabetes-associated autoantibodies after 7 years of follow-up, according to a study. "These findings do not support a benefit from hydrolyzed formula," authors conclude.

Among infants at risk for type 1 diabetes, the use of a hydrolyzed formula (one that does not contain intact proteins) compared with a conventional formula did not reduce the incidence of diabetes-associated autoantibodies after 7 years of follow-up, according to a study in the June 11 issue of JAMA, a diabetes theme issue.

Type 1 diabetes is characterized by selective loss of insulin-producing beta cells in the pancreatic islets in genetically susceptible individuals. The disease process leading to clinical type 1 diabetes often starts during the first years of life. Some studies have suggested that exposure to complex foreign proteins in early infancy may increase the risk of beta-cell autoimmunity and type l diabetes in genetically susceptible individuals, indicating that prevention of the initiation of diabetes should start in infancy, according to background information in the article.

Mikael Knip, M.D., D.M.Sc., of the University of Helsinki, Finland, and colleagues randomly assigned infants at risk of type 1 diabetes to be weaned to an extensively hydrolyzed formula (n = 1,078) or a conventional cows' milk-based formula (n = 1,081). The dietary intervention period lasted until the infant was at least 6 months of age, and up to a maximum of 8 months of age, depending on the amount of exposure to formula (to ensure exposure for at least 60 days). The study was conducted at 78 centers in 15 countries. The primary measured outcome was positivity for at least 2 diabetes-associated autoantibodies out of 4 analyzed during a median observation period of 7 years.

During the follow-up period, 2,070 children (1,035 in each group) provided at least 1 blood sample for determination of diabetes-associated autoantibodies. The researchers found that 139 children in the experimental group (13.4 percent) tested positive for 2 or more autoantibodies, as compared with 117 in the control group (11.3 percent). At least 1 autoantibody developed in 41.6 percent of those in the experimental group and in 40 percent of those in the control group.

The authors write that this study showed that in this large international trial, weaning to a highly hydrolyzed formula during infancy was not associated with any reduction in the signs of cumulative beta-cell autoimmunity. "These findings do not support a benefit from hydrolyzed formula."


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by American Medical Association. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Mikael Knip, Hans K. Εkerblom, Dorothy Becker, Hans-Michael Dosch, John Dupre, William Fraser, Neville Howard, Jorma Ilonen, Jeffrey P. Krischer, Olga Kordonouri, Margaret L. Lawson, Jerry P. Palmer, Erkki Savilahti, Outi Vaarala, Suvi M. Virtanen. Hydrolyzed Infant Formula and Early β-Cell Autoimmunity. JAMA, 2014; 311 (22): 2279 DOI: 10.1001/jama.2014.5610

Cite This Page:

American Medical Association. "Hydrolyzed formula does not reduce diabetes-associated autoantibodies in at-risk infants." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 10 June 2014. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/06/140610205105.htm>.
American Medical Association. (2014, June 10). Hydrolyzed formula does not reduce diabetes-associated autoantibodies in at-risk infants. ScienceDaily. Retrieved October 21, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/06/140610205105.htm
American Medical Association. "Hydrolyzed formula does not reduce diabetes-associated autoantibodies in at-risk infants." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/06/140610205105.htm (accessed October 21, 2014).

Share This



More Health & Medicine News

Tuesday, October 21, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

How Nigeria Beat Its Ebola Outbreak

How Nigeria Beat Its Ebola Outbreak

Newsy (Oct. 20, 2014) — The World Health Organization has declared Nigeria free of Ebola. Health experts credit a bit of luck and the government's initial response. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Another Study Suggests Viagra Is Good For The Heart

Another Study Suggests Viagra Is Good For The Heart

Newsy (Oct. 20, 2014) — An ingredient in erectile-dysfunction medications such as Viagra could improve heart function. Perhaps not surprising, given Viagra's history. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Ebola Worries End for Dozens on U.S. Watch Lists

Ebola Worries End for Dozens on U.S. Watch Lists

Reuters - US Online Video (Oct. 20, 2014) — Forty-three people who had contact with Thomas Eric Duncan, the first person diagnosed with Ebola in the U.S., were cleared overnight of twice-daily monitoring after 21 days of showing no symptoms. Rough Cut (no reporter narration). Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
CDC Calls for New Ebola Safety Guidelines

CDC Calls for New Ebola Safety Guidelines

AP (Oct. 20, 2014) — Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Director Dr. Tom Frieden laid out new guidelines for health care workers when dealing with the deadly Ebola virus including new precautions when taking off personal protective equipment. (Oct. 20) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
 
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:  

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories

 

Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:  

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile iPhone Android Web
Follow Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins