Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Strokefinder quickly differentiates bleeding strokes from clot-induced strokes

Date:
June 16, 2014
Source:
Chalmers University of Technology
Summary:
The results from the initial clinical studies involving the microwave helmet Strokefinder confirm the usefulness of microwaves for rapid and accurate diagnosis of stroke patients. Strokefinder enables earlier diagnosis than current methods, which improves the possibility to counteract brain damage.

Pictured is the prototype of Strokefinder used in the clinical studies. Presently, a mobile stroke helmet is being completed and will be used for testing the equipment in ambulance. Andreas Fhager at Chalmers University of Technology is one of the researchers who is developing the mobile stroke helmet.
Credit: Gunilla Brocker

The results from the initial clinical studies involving the microwave helmet Strokefinder confirm the usefulness of microwaves for rapid and accurate diagnosis of stroke patients. This is shown in a scientific article being published on June 16. Strokefinder enables earlier diagnosis than current methods, which improves the possibility to counteract brain damage.

In the article, researchers from Chalmers University of Technology, Sahlgrenska Academy and Sahlgrenska University Hospital present results from the initial patient studies completed last year. The study included 45 patients, and the results show that the technique can with great certainty differentiate bleeding strokes from clot-induced strokes in patients with acute symptoms.

Strokefinder is placed on the patient's head where it examines the brain tissue by using microwaves. The signals are interpreted by the system to determine if the stroke is caused by a blood clot or bleeding.

"The results of this study show that we will be able to increase the number of stroke patients who receive optimal treatment when the instrument makes a diagnosis already in the ambulance," says Mikael Persson, professor of biomedical engineering at Chalmers University of Technology. "The possibility to rule out bleeding already in the ambulance is a major achievement that will be of great benefit in acute stroke care. Equally exciting is the potential application in trauma care."

The initial patient studies have been performed inside hospitals, and this autumn the research groups at Chalmers and Sahlgrenska Academy will test a mobile stroke helmet on patients in ambulances.

"Our goal with Strokefinder is to diagnose and initiate treatment of stroke patients already in the ambulance," says Mikael Elam, professor of clinical neurophysiology at Sahlgrenska University Hospital. "Since time is a critical factor for stroke treatment, the use of the instrument leads to patients suffering less extensive injury. This in turn can shorten the length of stay at hospitals and reduce the need for rehabilitation, thus providing a number of other positive consequences for both the patient and the health care system."

Studies involving Strokefinder are currently being conducted in Sweden at Sahlgrenska University Hospital and Södra Älvsborg Hospital. The research is being conducted in close collaboration between Chalmers University of Technology, Sahlgrenska Academy, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Södra Älvsborg Hospital and MedTech West, which is a platform for collaboration in medical device R&D, with premises at Sahlgrenska University Hospital.

A new product, based on the results of the present study, has been developed, and further studies will be conducted in several countries in preparation for the CE approval that Medfield Diagnostics, a spin-off from Chalmers, expects to obtain later this year.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Chalmers University of Technology. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Mikael Persson et al. Microwave-based stroke diagnosis making global pre-hospital thrombolytic treatment possible. Biomedical Engineering, IEEE Transactions, June 2014 DOI: 10.1109/TBME.2014.2330554

Cite This Page:

Chalmers University of Technology. "Strokefinder quickly differentiates bleeding strokes from clot-induced strokes." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 16 June 2014. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/06/140616141537.htm>.
Chalmers University of Technology. (2014, June 16). Strokefinder quickly differentiates bleeding strokes from clot-induced strokes. ScienceDaily. Retrieved September 17, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/06/140616141537.htm
Chalmers University of Technology. "Strokefinder quickly differentiates bleeding strokes from clot-induced strokes." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/06/140616141537.htm (accessed September 17, 2014).

Share This



More Health & Medicine News

Wednesday, September 17, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

President To Send 3,000 Military Personnel To Fight Ebola

President To Send 3,000 Military Personnel To Fight Ebola

Newsy (Sep. 16, 2014) — President Obama is expected to send 3,000 troops to West Africa as part of the effort to contain Ebola's spread. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Man Floats for 31 Hours in Gulf Waters

Man Floats for 31 Hours in Gulf Waters

AP (Sep. 16, 2014) — A Texas man is lucky to be alive after he and three others floated for more than a day in the Gulf of Mexico when their boat sank during a fishing trip. (Sept. 16) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Ivorians Abandon Monkey Pets in Fear Over Ebola Virus

Ivorians Abandon Monkey Pets in Fear Over Ebola Virus

AFP (Sep. 16, 2014) — Since the arrival of Ebola in Ivory Coast, Ivorians have been abandoning their pets, particularly monkeys, in the fear that they may transmit the virus. Duration: 00:47 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Study Links Male-Pattern Baldness To Prostate Cancer

Study Links Male-Pattern Baldness To Prostate Cancer

Newsy (Sep. 16, 2014) — New findings suggest men with a certain type of baldness at age 45 are 39 percent more likely to develop aggressive prostate cancer. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
 
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:  

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

    Environment News

      Technology News



      Save/Print:
      Share:  

      Free Subscriptions


      Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

      Get Social & Mobile


      Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

      Have Feedback?


      Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
      Mobile iPhone Android Web
      Follow Facebook Twitter Google+
      Subscribe RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
      Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins